Navigation Links
Cancer virus protein needed for successful infection

New research shows that a protein made by a cancer-causing virus that was thought to be unimportant for its replication is in fact critically needed by the virus to initiate an infection and to reproduce.

The study examined the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and a protein it makes called p13. The protein is one of the virus' so-called accessory proteins, proteins that earlier studies done in laboratory-grown cells suggested that the virus could live without.

But this new study ?done using an animal model that the virus can infect ?suggests that HTLV-1 needs the p13 protein to successfully infect the body and reproduce.

The research, published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of Virology, was led by scientists with The Ohio State University Cancer Program and OSU College of Veterinary Medicine.

"It is important to understand the function of these accessory molecules so we know if they should be incorporated into vaccines or targeted by new drugs as a way to prevent infection," says principal investigator Michael Lairmore, professor and chair of veterinary biosciences and a member of the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"This viral protein is also important to study because it travels to the mitochondria of infected cells." Mitochondria produce the cell's energy supply and store enzymes that carry out the process of natural cell death, or apoptosis.

"These findings should help us begin to learn whether this viral protein influences cell survival, perhaps by extending the life of the cell," Lairmore says.

HTLV-1 infects an estimated 15 to 20 million people worldwide. About 5 percent of those infected develop adult T cell leukemia or lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive disease characterized by a long latent period and the proliferation of T lymphocytes. The virus is spread by sexual activity, infected blood and breast milk.

For this study, Lairmore and a group of collaborators developed a m utant strain of HTLV-1 that lacked p13. The researchers then infected one batch of rabbit T cells with the mutant virus and a second batch of rabbit T cells with a strain of normal HTLV-1.

Last, they inoculated six rabbits with T cells infected with virus that lacked the p13 protein and six rabbits with T cells infected with the normal virus. (HTLV-1 spreads when an infected cell touches an uninfected cell.)

The rabbits inoculated with the virus lacking p13 remained uninfected, while all six rabbits receiving cells with normal HTLV-1 became infected.

"Our findings are the first to indicate that the HTLV-1 p13 protein plays an essential biological role during the early phase of virus infection in an animal model," Lairmore says.

Next, the researchers will study the function of p13 in HTLV-1 infection, and how it affects mitochondria.


'"/>

Source:Ohio State University


Related biology news :

1. Adding Radiation Therapy To Chemotherapy Improves Survival In Patients With High-risk Breast Cancer
2. Jump-starting T Cells In Skin Cancer
3. Deficient DNA Repair Capacity Associated With Increased Risk Of Breast Cancer
4. Fox Chase Cancer Center scientists identify immune-system mutation
5. Breakthrough Microarray-based Technology for the Study of Cancer
6. Yale Scientists Find MicroRNA Regulates Ras Cancer Gene
7. Fundamental Finding Yields Insight into Stem Cells, Cancer; Opens Door to Drug Discovery
8. First-ever Compounds To Target Only Metastatic Cells Are Highly Effective Against Breast, Prostate, And Colon Cancers
9. Gene Vaccine Protects Mice Against Development Of Her2/neu Breast Cancer
10. New Breast Cancer Test Could Save Lives
11. Estrogen-like Component of Plastic Stimulates Growth of Certain Prostate Cancer Cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/11/2017)... Iowa , Jan. 11, 2017 Intoxalock, ... first with the release of its patent-pending calibration device. ... and reliably perform calibrations, securely upload data logs and ... for the customer. "Fighting drunk driving through ... for the public at large, but also for the ...
(Date:1/6/2017)... Colo. , Jan. 5, 2017  SomaLogic ... the "Digital Life Alliance" established by iCarbonX, the ... 2015 to build a "Global Digital Health Ecosystem ... on a combination of individual,s biological, behavioral and ... the agreement between the companies, SomaLogic will provide ...
(Date:1/4/2017)... , Jan. 4, 2017  CES 2017 – ... sensor technology, today announced the launch of two ... systems, the highly-accurate biometric sensor modules that incorporate ... technology, experience and expertise. The two new designs ... specifically for hearables, and Benchmark BW2.0, a 2-LED ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... 18, 2017 BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) (NYSE: ... it will host a live webcast of its Annual Meeting of ... The webcast can be accessed from the BD corporate ... Tuesday, January 31, 2017. ... About BD BD is a global medical technology ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... Jan. 18, 2017   Boston Biomedical , an ... to target cancer stemness pathways, will feature data from ... at the 2017 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, held from ... Napabucasin is an orally-administered investigational agent ... i Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess the property ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... Executives 2017 in its continued commitment to the advancement of the clinical trials ... current issues related to clinical trial planning and management. , As executive ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... Frederick, Maryland (PRWEB) , ... January 18, 2017 ... ... of two new federally funded bio-focused Manufacturing Innovation Institutes (MII). U.S. Secretary of ... Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL), and the Department of Defense has announced the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: