Navigation Links
Biomarkers may hone anti-aging therapies

Lotions and potions that promise to remove wrinkles and other effects of aging crowd cosmetics aisle shelves, but do these treatments really work?

Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have identified new molecular indicators -- or "biomarkers" -- of aging in the skin that could be used to evaluate anti-aging therapies. Their findings are reported in the February issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

"There's a lot of interest in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries in developing products that will minimize or reduce certain signs of aging," said James Sligh Jr., M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Medicine and Cell & Developmental Biology. "The quantifiable biomarkers we've characterized could be useful for monitoring laboratory-simulated aging as well as potential drugs or therapies that alter the aging process."

The new biomarkers are changes to the DNA of cellular organelles called mitochondria. Mitochondria, which have their own DNA that is distinct from the DNA in the cell's nucleus, serve as the "power plants" of the cell. They manufacture energy in the form of the molecule ATP. Energy generation includes, as a byproduct, the production of reactive oxygen species, which can damage the DNA present in mitochondria, Sligh said.

Some theories of cellular aging -- why and how cells age -- center on mitochondria and decreased energetic capacity resulting from mitochondrial DNA mutations, Sligh explained. In addition, mutations in mitochondrial DNA have been associated with tumor development.

"We initiated this project with the idea that perhaps there was a specific mitochondrial DNA deletion signature that would be associated with tumor development in the skin," Sligh said.

The investigators searched for mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in skin samples from patients having non-melanoma skin cancer removed in the Vanderbilt Mohs Clinic. Mohs micrographic surgery is a treatment for skin cancer, particularly the most common forms: basal and squamous cell carcinomas.

Sligh and colleagues were surprised to find a panel of mitochondrial DNA deletions in the tumor-free skin that was adjacent to the tumors, but not in the tumors themselves. The tumor samples were more likely to have full-length mitochondrial DNA, with point mutations rather than significant deletions, Sligh said.

The mitochondrial DNA mutations in the tumor-free skin correlated with the aging process, Sligh said. The newly identified deletion mutations will now go into "Mitomap," a database of all known human mitochondrial genome changes.

"Unraveling the molecular clues as to why aging cells function differently than young cells requires that we have molecular markers that we can track," Sligh said. "It won't be long before other investigators who have other human tissue specimens -- brain, lung, heart, for example -- look for these changes and report back.

"It will be interesting to see if the mitochondrial DNA mutations we've found are markers of aging in other tissues or if they are specific to tissues exposed to ultraviolet light."

Either way, the newly identified biomarkers will provide another tool for studying mitochondrial damage that contributes to aging and cancer, and for screening compounds that prevent or reverse the process, Sligh said.


'"/>

Source:Vanderbilt University Medical Center


Related biology news :

1. Biomarkers isolated from saliva successfully predict oral and breast cancer
2. Measurement Challenges In Detecting Cancer Biomarkers
3. Growth hormone is not the anti-aging bullet for healthy adults
4. Hopkins AIDS experts issue warning about global efforts to provide drug therapies
5. Powerful technique for multiplying adult stem cells may aid therapies
6. Novel method reveals how menthol discovery could point towards new or improved pain therapies
7. Molecular marker on stem cells aids research, perhaps therapies
8. A sweet step toward new cancer therapies
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/30/2017)... YORK , March 30, 2017 Trends, ... type (physiological and behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris ... voice recognition, and others), by end use industry (government ... and immigration, financial and banking, and others), and by ... Europe , Asia Pacific , ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... March 28, 2017 The report ... (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), ... - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the ... and is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion by ... 2022. The base year considered for the study is ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... , March 24, 2017 The Controller General ... Controller Mr. Abdulla Algeen have received the prestigious international IAIR ... Continue Reading ... ... picture) and Deputy Controller Abdulla Algeen (small picture on the right) have ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/22/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... Stratevi, a boutique firm that ... East Coast. It has opened an office in downtown Boston at 745 Atlantic Ave. ... increasingly more important to generate evidence on the value they provide, not just to ...
(Date:5/21/2017)... ... May 19, 2017 , ... ... conference of the American Association of Bioanalysts (AAB) and the College of Reproductive ... The conference reinforces AAB’s commitment to excellence in clinical laboratory services and regulations. ...
(Date:5/19/2017)... ... May 19, 2017 , ... The University ... researchers with technologies ripe for commercialization, and who are affiliated with the 21 ... to submit proposals. QED, now in its tenth round, is the first multi-institutional ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 16, 2017 , ... Clinical Supplies ... executive appointments as the company continues to grow. CSM has doubled in size ... and is executing an aggressive growth strategy. , Roger Gasper joins CSM as Chief ...
Breaking Biology Technology: