Navigation Links
Antioxidant selenium offers no heart-disease protection

Selenium does not protect against cardiovascular disease, despite its documented antioxidant and chemopreventive properties, analysis of a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial covering 13 years has shown. The selenium-CVD association was a secondary endpoint in the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial, which was designed primarily to determine if selenium supplementation could prevent the recurrence of non-melanoma skin cancer.

Results of the trial, the only large randomized clinical trial to date to examine selenium supplementation alone in the prevention of CVD, appear in the April 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology. Saverio Stranges, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of social and preventive medicine in the School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, is first author.

"Our results extend previous research based on smaller intervention trials focusing on cardiovascular risk factors," said Stranges. "Our findings are consistent with those from previous studies that have shown no beneficial effect of selenium supplementation in combination with other antioxidants on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease."

Several antioxidants, vitamins C and E in particular, that were thought to play a role in preventing heart disease based on observational studies have turned out not to be protective in randomized clinical trials, and selenium now has joined this group.

The main findings of this report focus on the 1,004 participants in the study, conducted from 1983-96, who were free of cardiovascular disease when they were recruited. Participants came from seven dermatology clinics in low selenium areas of the eastern United States: Augusta and Macon, Ga.; Columbia, S.C.; Miami, Fla.; Wilson and Greenville, N. C.; and Newington, Conn.

Enrollees were assigned randomly to take a tablet containing 200 micrograms of selenium daily or a placebo. Information on sociodemographics, he alth habits, education and body mass index also was collected.

Participants provided blood samples at their respective clinics twice a year and reported any new illnesses or medications. Individuals were followed for an average of 7.6 years.

Results showed no association between selenium supplementation on any of the endpoints studied: coronary heart disease, stroke or deaths from cardiovascular disease, Stranges said. There also was no difference in the endpoints based on the level of selenium at baseline. In addition, the lack of significant association with CVD endpoints was confirmed even in the 246 participants who had CVD at baseline. (This data does not appear in the published manuscript.)

"These results must be interpreted cautiously," said Stranges, "because they result from exploratory analyses, although from the largest randomized clinical trial available that has selenium only as the intervention. However, this report adds important information to our knowledge on the role of selenium in cardiovascular-disease prevention, indicating no overall benefit of supplementation by selenium alone in prevention of cardiovascular disease."


Source:University at Buffalo

Related biology news :

1. Antioxidant protects against lung damage in silicosis
2. Transgenic plants remove more selenium from polluted soil than wild plants, new tests show
3. New moth variety disarms plants guarded by selenium
4. Protein offers way to stop microscopic parasites in their tracks
5. Gene silencing technique offers new strategy for treating, curing disease
6. Mosaic mouse technique offers a powerful new tool to study diseases and genetics
7. Engineered skin offers clues to melanoma development
8. GM crop that holds on to its seeds offers higher yields
9. Novel enzyme offers new look at gene regulation
10. Technique offers new view of dynamic biological landscape
11. Microbiology text tells stories, offers online resources
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/17/2015)... 2015 Paris , ... --> Paris , qui s,est tenu ... le leader de l,innovation biométrique, a inventé le premier ... empreintes sur la même surface de balayage. Jusqu,ici, deux ... pour les empreintes digitales. Désormais, un seul scanner est ...
(Date:11/17/2015)... SOUTH EASTON, Mass. , Nov. 17, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... "Company"), a leader in the development and sale of ... to the worldwide life sciences industry, today announced it ... closing of its $5 million Private Placement (the "Offering"), ... Offering to $4,025,000.  One or more additional closings are ...
(Date:11/12/2015)... 12, 2015  A golden retriever that stayed healthy ... (DMD) has provided a new lead for treating this ... Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the University ... Cell, pinpoints a protective gene ... disease,s effects. The Boston Children,s lab of Lou ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... CITY , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ - Aeterna ... affirms that its business and prospects remain fundamentally ... , Zoptrex™ (zoptarelin doxorubicin) recently received DSMB recommendation ... to completion following review of the final interim ... Phase 2 Primary Endpoint in men with heavily ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , November 25, 2015 ... Research Report is a professional and in-depth study ...      (Logo: ) , ... of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and ... provided for the international markets including development trends, ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... HILLS, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... as the recipient of the 2016 USGA Green Section Award. Presented annually since 1961, ... golf through his or her work with turfgrass. , Clarke, of Iselin, ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... - iCo Therapeutics ("iCo" or "the Company") (TSX-V: ICO) ... quarter ended September 30, 2015. Amounts, unless specified ... under International Financial Reporting Standards ("IFRS"). ... Andrew Rae , President & CEO of iCo ... value enriching for this clinical program, but also ...
Breaking Biology Technology: