Navigation Links
A key antibody, IgG, links cells' capture and disposal of germs

Scientists have found a new task managed by the antibody that's the workhorse of the human immune system: Inside cells, Immunoglobulin G (IgG) helps bring together the phagosomes that corral invading pathogens and the potent lysosomes that eventually kill off the germs.

The research, by Axel Nohturfft at Harvard University and colleagues at Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"The IgG class of antibodies is a critical part of the human immune system, guarding us against infection by an endless array of microorganisms," says Nohturfft, associate professor of molecular and cellular biology in Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences. "Our findings add yet another immunological task to the list of those handled by IgG."

While just one of several broad classes of human antibodies, IgG is by far the most important -- so much so that patients incapable of making their own antibodies to fight off infections are routinely treated with IgG alone. Broadly speaking, the immunological powerhouse manages the processes by which cells isolate and then kill invading microbes, viruses, and other antigens.

In a process called phagocytosis, intruding germs are first swallowed up by amoeba-like white blood cells and stored in membrane pouches called phagosomes. These compartments then fuse with lysosomes, toxic cellular reservoirs that kill and degrade the sequestered antigens by flooding the phagosomes with acid and destructive proteins.

IgG, Nohturfft and his colleagues report, plays a key role in this merger of phagosomes and lysosomes into the so-called phagolysosomes that finally do in most invading microbes. Specifically, the antibody prompts phagosomes and lysosomes to dock and bind to each other with actin filaments, the first step in the unification of the two vesicles.

Among the antibody's other kn own roles, Nohturfft's group has now shown that IgG serves to accelerate the creation of phagolysosomes. Under physiological conditions, the scientists found that latex beads coated with IgG formed phagolysosomes in just a third the time it took the cellular machinery to process uncoated beads, 15 minutes versus 45 minutes.

"This process is central to the human immune response," Nohturfft says. "But some of the most destructive microbial pathogens, such as those responsible for tuberculosis and salmonellosis, are able to hijack cells and use them as a breeding ground precisely because they block the merger of phagosomes and lysosomes. It had long been known that coating these germs with IgG can restore their destruction and our recent results reveal a new branch of this IgG-led counterattack."
'"/>

Source:Harvard University


Related biology news :

1. NASA links nanobacteria to kidney stones and other diseases
2. Insight into DNAs weakest links may yield clues to cancer biology
3. One gene links newborn neurons with those that die in diseases such as Alzheimers
4. Genetic links could unlock clues to leading cause of blindness
5. Climate model links higher temperatures to prehistoric extinction
6. Genetics links whale to two different ocean basins
7. Scientists discover a genetic switch that links animal growth and cancer
8. Hap1 protein links circulating insulin to brain circuits that regulate feeding behavior in mice
9. Imaging study links key genetic risk for Alzheimers disease to myelin breakdown
10. Queensland scientists identify molecule that links both sides of the brain
11. Study links high levels of nitric oxide to infertility and sperm DNA damage

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/22/2016)... ANGELES , June 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... identity management and verification solutions, has partnered ... edge software solutions for Visitor Management, Self-Service ... provides products that add functional enhancements ... partnership provides corporations and venues with an ...
(Date:6/15/2016)... New York , June 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a new market report titled "Gesture Recognition Market by ... and Forecast, 2016 - 2024". According to the report, ... USD 11.60 billion in 2015 and is estimated ... reach USD 48.56 billion by 2024.  ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... LONDON , June 2, 2016 ... has awarded the 44 million US Dollar project, ... Security Embossed Vehicle Plates including Personalization, Enrolment, and IT Infrastructure ... world leader in the production and implementation of Identity Management ... in January, however Decatur was selected ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... STACS DNA Inc., the ... at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory, has joined STACS DNA as a Field Application ... team,” said Jocelyn Tremblay, President and COO of STACS DNA. “In further expanding our ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Apellis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ... clinical trials of its complement C3 inhibitor, APL-2. ... multiple ascending dose studies designed to assess the ... subcutaneous injection in healthy adult volunteers. ... as a single dose (ranging from 45 to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Andrew D ... http://doi.org/10.17925/OHR.2016.12.01.22 Published recently in ... from touchONCOLOGY, Andrew D Zelenetz , discusses ... care is placing an increasing burden on healthcare ... therapies. With the patents on many biologics expiring, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ClinCapture, the only free validated ... will showcase its product’s latest features from June 26 to June 30, 2016 ... on Disrupting Clinical Trials in The Cloud during the conference. DIA (Drug ...
Breaking Biology Technology: