Navigation Links
Young gamers offer insight to teaching new physicians robotic surgery
Date:11/15/2012

What can high school and college-age video game enthusiasts teach young surgeons-in-training?

According to a new study from researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) a world leader in minimally invasive and robotic surgery the superior hand-eye coordination and hand skills gained from hours of repetitive joystick maneuvers mimic the abilities needed to perform today's most technologically-advanced robotic surgeries.

To offer insight on how best to train future surgeons, the study placed high school and college students head to head with resident physicians in robotic surgery simulations. The results, presented at the American Gynecologic Laparoscopists' 41st Annual Global Congress on Minimally Invasive Gynecology in Las Vegas, were surprising.

Both high school sophomores who played video games on average two hours per day and college students who played four hours of video games daily matched, and in some cases exceeded, the skills of the residents on parameters that included how much tension the subjects put on their instruments, how precise their hand-eye coordination was and how steady their grasping skills were when performing surgical tasks suck as suturing, passing a needle or lifting surgical instruments with the robotic arms.

"The inspiration for this study first developed when I saw my son, an avid video game player, take the reins of a robotic surgery simulator at a medical convention," said Dr. Sami Kilic, lead author of the study and associate professor and director of minimally invasive gynecology in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at UTMB. "With no formal training, he was immediately at ease with the technology and the type of movements required to operate the robot."

Specifically, the UTMB study measured participants' competency on more than 20 different skill parameters and 32 different teaching steps on the robotic surgery simulator a training tool that resembles a video game booth complete with dual-hand-operated controllers a video monitor that displays real-time surgical movements. As a whole, the nine tenth graders participating in the study performed the best, followed by nine students from Texas A&M University and lastly the 11 UTMB residents; the mean age of each group was 16, 21 and 31 respectively.

For further comparison, the groups were tested in a simulation of a non-robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery. In this scenario, when presented with a complicated surgical technique that does not rely on the visual-spatial coordination present in robotic surgery, the resident physicians scored far higher than the high school gamers.

Kilic notes these observations point to a need for surgical training to adapt to future generations of doctors who will arrive at medical school with an affinity for emerging surgical techniques. "Most physicians in practice today never learned robotic surgery in medical school," said Kilic. "However, as we see students with enhanced visual-spatial experience and hand-eye coordination that are a result of the technologically-savvy world they are immersed in, we should rethink how best to teach this generation."

Since the best results were seen in students who played video games up to two hours daily and not those who played four hours daily, this could indicate the optimal time needed for medical residents to gain these skills according to Kilic.

The high-tech simulators used in this study are a staple of the UTMB training program for performing minimally invasive robotic surgery. The institution is among a handful of academic medical centers that are establishing standardized programs aimed at training both medical students and practicing physicians in how to use robotic surgical tools and techniques most effectively.

Through its minimally invasive and robot-assisted surgery area of excellence, UTMB trains 32 residents and numerous faculty and other practicing physicians, including international surgeons from England, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and Turkey, annually.


'/>"/>

Contact: Olivia Goodman
olivia.goodman@gabbe.com
732-277-5625
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Omega-3 intake heightens working memory in healthy young adults
2. 2013 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Awards announced
3. Can videogaming benefit young people with autism spectrum disorder?
4. 6 NARSAD Young Investigator Grants awarded to CAMH
5. For young birds, getting stressed out can be a good thing
6. ONR-funded young innovators recognized by President
7. IU biologist receives Department of Energys top young faculty award
8. Hormones dictate when youngsters fly the nest, says new research
9. Child welfare investigation predicts mental health problems in young children
10. New review outlines screening strategies for osteoporosis in young adults
11. Top young Latin-American scientists named Pew Biomedical Fellows
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/28/2016)... LONDON , Nov. 28, 2016 ... at a rate of 16.79%" The biometric system ... to grow further in the near future. The biometric ... 32.73 billion in 2022, at a CAGR of 16.79% ... biometrics system, integration of biometric technology in smartphones, rising ...
(Date:11/22/2016)... According to the new market research report "Biometric System Market by Authentication ... (Hardware and Software), Function (Contact and Non-contact), Application, and Region - Global ... from USD 10.74 Billion in 2015 to reach USD 32.73 Billion by ... Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:11/21/2016)... 21, 2016   Neurotechnology , a provider ... today announced that the MegaMatcher On Card fingerprint ... for the NIST Minutiae Interoperability Exchange (MINEX) ... mandatory steps of the evaluation protocol. ... test of fingerprint templates used to establish compliance ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... the business of innovation is taking over sports. On Thursday, December 15th a ... how technology is disrupting the playing field at a Smart Talk session. Smart ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... SAN DIEGO , Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... treatments for congestive heart failure and type 2 ... license for a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector ... Kay , M.D., Ph.D., at Stanford University. The ... of its paracrine gene therapy product pipeline. ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... that provide essential device-to-computer interconnect using USB or PCI Express, announced the FOMD-ACV-A4, ... The FOMD-ACV-A4 is a small, thin, SODIMM-style module that fits a standard 204-pin ...
(Date:12/8/2016)...  Anaconda BioMed S.L., a pre-clinical stage medical device ... neuro-thrombectomy system for the treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke ... to join its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). The SAB ... scientific and clinical experts to Anaconda BioMed S.L., as ... ® to its clinical phase. The SAB is ...
Breaking Biology Technology: