Navigation Links
Yale scientists create artificial 'cells' that boost the immune response to cancer
Date:2/26/2008

New Haven, Conn. Using artificial cell-like particles, Yale biomedical engineers have devised a rapid and efficient way to produce a 45-fold enhancement of T cell activation and expansion, an immune response important for a patients ability to fight cancer and infectious diseases, according to an advance on line report in Molecular Therapy.

The artificial cells, developed by Tarek Fahmy, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Yale and his graduate student Erin Steenblock, are made of a material commonly used for biodegradable sutures. The authors say that the new method is the first off-the-shelf antigen-presenting artificial cell that can be tuned to target a specific disease or infection.

This procedure is likely to make it to the clinic rapidly, said senior author Fahmy. All of the materials we use are natural, biodegradable already have FDA approval.

Cancer, viral infections and autoimmune diseases have responded to immunotherapy that boosts a patients own antigen-specific T cells. In those previous procedures, a patients immune cells were harvested and then exposed to cells that stimulate the activation and proliferation of antigen-specific T-cells. The boosted immune cells were then infused back into the patient to attack the disease.

Limitations of these procedures include costly and tedious custom isolation of cells for individual patients and the risk of adverse reaction to foreign cells, according to the Yale researchers. They also pointed to difficulty in obtaining and maintaining sufficient numbers of activated T-cells for effective therapeutic response.

In the new system, the outer surface of each particle is covered in universal adaptor molecules that serve as attachment points for antigens molecules that activate the patients T-cells to recognize and fight off the targeted disease and for stimulatory molecules. Inside of each particle, there are slowly released cytokines that further stimulate the activated T-cells to proliferate to as much as 45 times their original number.

Our process introduces several important improvements, said lead author Steenblock. First, the universal surface adaptors allow us to add a span of targeting antigen and co-stimulatory molecules. We can also create a sustained release of encapsulated cytokines. These enhancements mimic the natural binding and signaling events that lead to T-cell proliferation in the body. It also causes a fast and effective stimulation of the patients T-cells particularly T-cells of the cytotoxic type important for eradicating cancer.

Safe and efficient T-cell stimulation and proliferation in response to specific antigens is a goal of immunotherapy against infectious disease and cancer, said Fahmy. Our ability to manipulate this response so rapidly and naturally with an off the shelf reproducible biomaterial is a big step forward.

Fahmy was recently awarded a five-year National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award for work on this process and ways of engineering biomaterials to manipulate immune responses to fight cancer and other diseases. His approach incorporates signals important for T-cell stimulation in biocompatible polymer particulates, and integrates all the signals needed for efficient T-cell stimulation.

According to the NSF, devices as such these offer ease and flexibility in targeting different types of T-cells, and is expected to lead to state of the art improvements in the preparation of a new generation of therapeutic systems.


'/>"/>

Contact: Janet Rettig Emanuel
janet.emanuel@yale.edu
203-432-2157
Yale University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Scientists unravel the genetic coding of the pea
2. Scientists discover giant fossil frog from hell
3. Advertisers, neuroscientists trace source of emotions in brain
4. Amazon corridors far too narrow, warn scientists
5. Dung happens and helps scientists
6. Priming scientists for successful media interviews
7. Scientists expand understanding of how river carbon impacts the Arctic Ocean
8. Fishermen and UCSB scientists explore ways to improve management of California spiny lobsters
9. Scientists rebuild ancient proteins to reveal primordial Earths temperature
10. Rice scientists make breakthrough in single-molecule sensing
11. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging, biosensor design
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Yale scientists create artificial 'cells' that boost the immune response to cancer
(Date:1/6/2017)... 2017  SomaLogic announced today that it has ... by iCarbonX, the China -based ... Digital Health Ecosystem that can define each person,s ... biological, behavioral and psychological data, the Internet and ... SomaLogic will provide proteomics data and applications expertise ...
(Date:12/22/2016)... 20, 2016  As part of its longstanding mission to ... genetics company, recently released its latest children,s book, titled ... focuses on the topics of inheritance and variation of traits ... taught in elementary school classrooms in the US. ... illustrator Ariana Killoran , whose previous book with 23andMe, ...
(Date:12/16/2016)... , Dec. 16, 2016   IdentyTechSolutions America ... management products and solutions and a cutting-edge manufacturer ... that it is offering seamless, integrated solutions that ... entrance products. The solutions provide IdentyTech,s customers with ... their facilities from crime and theft. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) (NYSE: ... will host a live webcast of its Annual Meeting of Shareholders ... The webcast can be accessed from the BD corporate website ... January 31, 2017. ... About BD BD is a global medical technology company ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... --  Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) , a nonprofit ... dystrophy (Duchenne) , today announced a $600,000 grant to ... (NJIT) and Talem Technologies (Talem) as part of the ... assist people living with Duchenne. PPMD is funding a ... computer, software, a force sensor and a motor – ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... Gainesville, FL (PRWEB) , ... January 18, 2017 ... ... muscle weakness and paralysis, today announced that it has submitted a 510(k) to ... stationary bikes that utilize MYOLYN’s patent-pending functional electrical stimulation (FES) technology. , ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... Thirty-six startup companies in University ... the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development in 2016 as part of the ... the University City Keystone Innovation Zone and represent the highest number of awards to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: