Navigation Links
Yale researchers uncover secrets of salmonella's stealth attack
Date:4/16/2009

A single crafty protein allows the deadly bacterium Salmonella enterica to both invade cells lining the intestine and hijack cellular functions to avoid destruction, Yale researchers report in the April 17 issue of the journal Cell.

This evolutionary slight-of-hand sheds new insights into the lethal tricks of Salmonella, which kills more than 2 million people a year.

"In evolutionary terms, this hijacking of cellular machinery to diversify the function of a bacterial protein is mind boggling,'' said Jorge Galan, senior author of the paper and the Lucille P. Markey Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and Cell Biology and chair of microbial pathogenesis at Yale.

Salmonella causes disease when it takes control of cells lining the intestinal track using its own specialized "nano-syringe" called a type III secretion system. Using this structure, Salmonella injects bacterial proteins that mimic proteins of the host cell and help the pathogen avoid destruction.

The Yale study describes the crucial role a bacterial protein called SopB plays in both Salmonella's forced entry into the cell and its subsequent internal camouflage act. First, SopB works within the external membrane of the cell, called the plasma membrane, to coax the cell into taking in the pathogen, which is then encapsulated within a tiny bubble-like compartment called a vesicle.

SopB's second trick helps prevent the vesicle from being sucked into the lyosome, the organelle within the cell that degrades proteins. In order to accomplish this, SopB must move from the plasma membrane of the cell to the membrane of the internal vesicle containing the pathogen. The Yale group found that Salmonella coaxes the cell to "mark" the SopB protein with a tag called ubiquitin. Addition of this tag makes the bacterial protein recognizable to the cellular machinery that normally moves proteins from the plasma membranes to internal vesicles.

"These studies provide a unique insight into the mechanisms by which this important pathogen causes disease," Galan said. "In addition, this finding may point to a novel paradigm that may be applicable to other important pathogens."


'/>"/>

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify proteins involved in new neurodegenerative syndrome
2. Texas researchers and educators head for Antarctica
3. MGH researchers describe new way to identify, evolve novel enzymes
4. University of Pennsylvania researchers develop formula to gauge risk of disease clusters
5. U of MN researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
6. U of Minnesota researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
7. Researchers discover new strategies for antibiotic resistance
8. Researchers find new taste in fruit flies: carbonated water
9. Binghamton University researchers investigate evolving malaria resistance
10. UIC researchers find promising new targets for antibiotics
11. Researchers develop simple method to create natural drug products
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/9/2016)... -- Elevay is currently known as the ... high net worth professionals seeking travel for work   ... there is still no substitute for a face-to-face meeting. ... deal with a firm handshake. This is why wealthy ... citizenship via investment programs like those offered by the ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... and LONDON , April ... part of EdgeVerve Systems, a product subsidiary of ... today announced a partnership to integrate the Onegini ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151104/283829LOGO ) ... their customers enhanced security to access and transact ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... , April 15, 2016 ... "Global Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their ... ) , ,The global gait biometrics market ... 13.98% during the period 2016-2020. Gait ... which can be used to compute factors that ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/22/2016)... , ... June 21, 2016 , ... New light-based technologies ... into the tissue — promise to enable both compact, wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics ... deeper under the skin. , Recent work and visionary future directions are detailed in ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... 22, 2016  Mesa Biotech Inc., a privately-held, ... platform designed specifically for point-of-care (POC) infectious disease ... advisory board (SAB). Approved by the executive leadership ... chartered to advise on the development and commercialization ... by Dr. Steve Young , this world-class ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... On Tuesday, June 21, 2016, the NASDAQ Composite ... Jones Industrial Average advanced 0.14% to finish at 17,829.73; and ... were broad based as five out of nine sectors ended ... following equities: Minerva Neurosciences Inc. (NASDAQ: NERV ), ... (NASDAQ: TRVN ), and Anthera Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ...
(Date:6/21/2016)... ... 21, 2016 , ... Three young scientists are being recognized for discovering novel ... with today’s announcement of the winners of the 2016 Blavatnik National Awards for ... Foundation and administered by the New York Academy of Sciences , honor the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: