Navigation Links
Yale researchers develop a way to monitor engineered blood vessels as they grow in patients
Date:11/30/2011

Bethesda, MDUsing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle technology, researchers from Yale have devised a way to monitor the growth of laboratory-engineered blood vessels after they have been implanted in patients. This advance represents an important step toward ensuring that blood vessels, and possibly other tissues engineered from a patient's own biological material, are taking hold and working as expected. Until now, there has been no way to monitor the growth and progress of engineered tissues once they were implanted. This research was published in the December 2011 issue of the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org).

"We hope that the important findings from our study will serve as a valuable tool for physicians and scientists working to better understand the biological mechanisms involved in tissue engineering," said Christopher K. Breuer, M.D., co-author of the study from the Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. "Resulting advances will hopefully usher in a new era of personalized medical treatments where replacement vessels are specifically designed for each patient suffering from cardiac anomalies and disease."

To make this advance, scientists used two different groups of cells to make tissue-engineered blood vessels. In the first group, the cells were labeled with the MRI contrast agent. In the second group, the cells were normal and did not have an MRI label. Cells from each group were then used to create separate laboratory-engineered blood vessels, which were implanted into mice. The purpose was to see whether the laboratory-engineered blood vessels made from cells that were labeled with the contrast agent would indeed be visible on MRI and to make sure that the addition of the contrast agent did not negatively affect the cells or the function of the laboratory-engineered vessels. Researchers imaged the mice with MRI and found that it was possible to track the cells labeled with contrast agent, but not possible to track the cells that were not labeled. This suggests that using MRI and cellular contrast agents to study cellular changes in the tissue-engineered blood vessels after they are implanted is an effective way to monitor these types of vessels.

"This is great news for patients with congenital heart defects, who have to undergo tissue grafting, but that's only the tip of the scalpel," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal. "As we progress toward an era of personalized medicinewhere patients' own tissues and cells will be re-engineered into replacement organs and treatmentswe will need noninvasive ways to monitor what happens inside the body in real time. This technique fulfills another promise of nanobiology."


'/>"/>

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. NJIT researchers publish news of success with robots as learning tool
2. Researchers new recipe cooks up better tissue phantoms
3. BUSM researchers develop blood test to detect membranous nephropathy
4. WSU researchers use a 3-D printer to make bone-like material
5. Abstinence-only education does not lead to abstinent behavior, UGA researchers find
6. Body rebuilding: Researchers regenerate muscle in mice
7. UCLA researchers engineer blood stem cells to fight melanoma
8. BWH researchers develop a vaccine prototype stronger than traditional vaccines
9. The immune system has protective memory cells, researchers discover
10. Researchers awarded $3.2 million from NIH to pioneer advanced biomolecule discovery technology
11. 3 researchers in the Amazon clear up doubts as to the benefits of ecotourism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/26/2016)... and LONDON , April 26, ... of EdgeVerve Systems, a product subsidiary of Infosys ... announced a partnership to integrate the Onegini mobile ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151104/283829LOGO ) ... customers enhanced security to access and transact across ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... TEL AVIV, Israel , April 14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... in Behavioral Authentication and Malware Detection, today announced the ... has already assumed the new role. Goldwerger,s ... for BioCatch, on the heels of the deployment of ... In addition, BioCatch,s behavioral biometric technology, which discerns unique ...
(Date:3/23/2016)... , March 23, 2016 ... erhöhter Sicherheit Gesichts- und Stimmerkennung mit Passwörtern ... (NASDAQ: MESG ), ein führender ... das Unternehmen mit SpeechPro zusammenarbeitet, um erstmals ... Finanzdienstleistungsbranche, wird die Möglichkeit angeboten, im Rahmen ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... - BIOREM Inc. (TSX-V: BRM) ("Biorem" or "the Company") announces ... Clean Technology Fund I, LP and Clean Technology Fund ... venture capital funds which together hold approximately 59% of ... as converted basis), that they have entered into an ... in Biorem to TUS Holdings Co. Ltd. ("TUS") (en.tusholdings.com) ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... Rolf K. Hoffmann, former senior vice ... University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School effective June 27. , ... with a focus on the school’s international efforts, leading classes and participating in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... While the majority of commercial spectrophotometers and ... and the 6000i models are higher end machines that use the more unconventional z-dimension ... light beam from the bottom of the cuvette holder. , FireflySci has developed ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - FACIT has ... Ontario biotechnology company, Propellon Therapeutics Inc. ... and commercialization of a portfolio of first-in-class WDR5 ... targets such as WDR5 represent an exciting class ... in precision medicine for cancer patients. Substantial advances ...
Breaking Biology Technology: