Navigation Links
Yale journal finds nanomaterials may have large environmental footprint
Date:10/22/2008

New Haven, Conn.Environmental gains derived from the use of nanomaterials may be offset in part by the process used to manufacture them, according to research published in a special issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology.

Hatice Şengl and colleagues at the University of Illinois at Chicago assert that strict material purity requirements, lower tolerances for defects and lower yields of manufacturing processes may lead to greater environmental burdens than those associated with conventional manufacturing. In a separate study of carbon nanofiber production, Vikas Khanna and colleagues at Ohio State University found, for example, that the life-cycle environmental impacts may be as much as 100 times greater per unit of weight than those of traditional materials, potentially offsetting some of the environmental benefits of the small size of nanomaterials.

Materials engineered at dimensions of 1 to 100 nanometers (1 to100 billionths of a meter) exhibit novel physical, chemical and biological characteristics, opening possibilities for stunning innovations in medicine, manufacturing and a host of other sectors of the economy. Because small quantities of nanomaterials can accomplish the tasks of much larger amounts of conventional materials, the expectation has been that nanomaterials will lower energy and resource use and the pollution that accompanies them. The possibility of constructing miniature devices atom-by-atom has also given rise to expectations that precision in nanomanufacturing will lead to less waste and cleaner processes.

"Research in this issue reveals the potential of environmental impacts from nanomanufacturing to offset the benefits of using lighter nanomaterials," says Gus Speth, dean of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. "To date, most attention has focused on the possible toxic effects of exposure to nanoparticles and appropriately so. But considerations of pollution and energy use arising from the production technologies used to make nanomaterials need attention as well."

Other topics explored in the special issue include:

  • Approaches for identifying and reducing the life cycle hazards of nanomaterials
  • Quantified life cycle energy requirements and environmental impacts from nanomaterials
  • Tradeoffs between nanomanufacturing costs and occupational exposure to nanoparticles
  • Efficiency of techniques for nanomaterials synthesis
  • Improvement of the sustainability of bio-based products through nanotechnology
  • Industrial frameworks for responsible nanotechnology
  • Industrial and public perception about the risks and benefits of nanomaterials
  • Governance and regulation of nanotechnology

Industrial ecology is a field that examines the opportunities for sustainable production and consumption, emphasizing the importance of a systems view of environmental threats and remedies. "Through the use of tools such as life cycle assessment, green chemistry and pollution prevention, industrial ecology takes a broad and deliberate view of environmental challenges," states Reid Lifset, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Industrial Ecology. "This special issue shows the power of this approach."


'/>"/>

Contact: David DeFusco
david.defusco@yale.edu
203-436-4842
Yale University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. News tips from the Journal of Neuroscience
2. Tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology
3. Story ideas from the Journal of Lipid Research
4. Highlights from the September 2007 Journal of the American Dietetic Association
5. AGU journal highlights -- Sept. 6, 2007
6. Springer will publish Journal of Coastal Conservation
7. ESA celebrates 100 years of insect science journals
8. Springer and the New York Botanical Garden Press join forces to publish botanical journals
9. 200 journals join in theme issues on poverty and human development
10. New ETH Zurich article published in scientific journal Nature
11. Media highlights in the November issues of Biophysical Journal
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period 2017-2021. ... been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from ... prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... , April 6, 2017 ... RFID, ANPR, Document Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, ... Facility, Oil, Gas & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), ... Educational, Other) Are you looking for a ... sector? ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 4, 2017 KEY FINDINGS ... anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 25.76% during ... diseases is the primary factor for the growth of ... report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4807905/ MARKET INSIGHTS The global ... product, technology, application, and geography. The stem cell market ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/18/2017)... ... July 18, 2017 , ... Recently recognized by CIO Magazine ... the migration of its flagship cloud-based product Planet Life Cycle – a robust ... management system that merges strategic and financial planning with execution. The solution is ...
(Date:7/17/2017)... ... 17, 2017 , ... OHAUS Corporation, a leading worldwide manufacturer ... new line of Heavy-Duty Orbital Shakers today. , Eight New Models Available, OHAUS ... applications. These shakers are ideal for load capacities from 35 to 150 ...
(Date:7/17/2017)... Iowa (PRWEB) , ... July 17, 2017 , ... ... component of its long-standing innovation strategy. A website (openinnovation.pioneer.com) dedicated to ... five strategic areas – trait discovery, plant breeding, enabling technologies, biologicals and digital ...
(Date:7/14/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 14, 2017 , ... ... conscious EMS company . Sonic Manufacturing Technologies has installed a solar system on ... in a three-year period,” the President of Sonic, Kenneth Raab stated. The company’s ...
Breaking Biology Technology: