Navigation Links
Women more likely than men to accept global warming

EAST LANSING, Mich. Women tend to believe the scientific consensus on global warming more than men, according to a study by a Michigan State University researcher.

The findings, published in the September issue of the journal Population and Environment, challenge common perceptions that men are more scientifically literate, said sociologist Aaron M. McCright.

"Men still claim they have a better understanding of global warming than women, even though women's beliefs align much more closely with the scientific consensus," said McCright, an associate professor with appointments in MSU's Department of Sociology, Lyman Briggs College and Environmental Science and Policy Program.

The study is one of the first to focus in-depth on how the genders think about climate change. The findings also reinforce past research that suggests women lack confidence in their science comprehension.

"Here is yet another study finding that women underestimate their scientific knowledge a troubling pattern that inhibits many young women from pursuing scientific careers," McCright said.

Understanding how the genders think about the environment is important on several fronts, said McCright, who calls climate change "the most expansive environmental problem facing humanity."

"Does this mean women are more likely to buy energy-efficient appliances and hybrid vehicles than men?" he said. "Do they vote for different political candidates? Do they talk to their children differently about global warming?"

McCright analyzed eight years of data from Gallup's annual environment poll that asked fairly basic questions about climate change knowledge and concern. He said the gender divide on concern about climate change was not explained by the roles that men and women perform such as whether they were homemakers, parents or employed full time.

Instead, he said the gender divide likely is explained by "gender socialization." According to this theory, boys in the United States learn that masculinity emphasizes detachment, control and mastery. A feminine identity, on the other hand, stresses attachment, empathy and care traits that may make it easier to feel concern about the potential dire consequences of global warming, McCright said.

"Women and men think about climate change differently," he said. "And when scientists or policymakers are communicating about climate change with the general public, they should consider this rather than treating the public as one big monolithic audience."


Contact: Aaron M. McCright
Michigan State University

Related biology news :

1. Women do not recover their muscle strength as fast as men
2. Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital expand national childrens study to Bristol County
3. Vitamin K does not stem BMD decline in postmenopausal women with osteopenia
4. Study: Elderly Women can increase strength but still risk falls
5. Pregnant women consuming flaxseed oil have high risk of premature birth
6. 17th Annual Congress on Womens Health convenes
7. Pregnant women with asthma can be more confident about some medicines
8. Men are red, women are green, Brown researcher finds
9. Statin warning for pregnant women
10. Long-term use of diabetes drugs by women significantly increases risk of fractures
11. Women double fruit, veggie intake with switch to Mediterranean diet plan
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Women more likely than men to accept global warming
(Date:4/11/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period 2017-2021. ... prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry ... over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... independent Directors Mr. Robin D. Richards and Mr. ... the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , Chief Executive Officer said," ... and benefiting from their considerable expertise as we move forward ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 5, 2017  The Allen Institute ... Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital ... 3D imaging data, the first application of deep learning ... human stem cell lines and a growing suite of ... platform for these and future publicly available resources created ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/9/2017)... 2017  BioTech Holdings announced today identification and ... ProCell stem cell therapy prevents limb loss in ... demonstrated that treatment with ProCell resulted in more ... compared to standard bone marrow stem cell administration.  ... reduction of therapeutic effect.  ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... 09, 2017 , ... The Giving Tree Wellness Center announces ... needs of consumers who are incorporating medical marijuana into their wellness and health ... As operators of two successful Valley dispensaries, The Giving Tree’s two founders, Lilach ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... its ProxiMeta™ Hi-C metagenome deconvolution product, featuring the first commercially available Hi-C ... software to perform Hi-C metagenome deconvolution using their own facilities, supplementing the ...
(Date:10/6/2017)... D.C. (PRWEB) , ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... will host a lunch discussion and webinar on INSIGhT, the first-ever adaptive clinical ... Principal Investigator, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The event is free and open to the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: