Navigation Links
Without adequate funding, deadly wheat disease could threaten global food supplies
Date:4/15/2013

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (04/15/2013) -- Disease-resistant wheat developed over the past half century helped ensure steady world food supplies, but a global team led by researchers from the University of Minnesota warns in a new paper that without increased financial support for disease resistance research, new strains of a deadly fungal disease could leave millions without affordable access to food.

The study, published in the current edition of the journal Science, examines how Ug99 new virulent forms of stem rust first found in Uganda in 1999could continue its movement across Africa, the Middle East and southwest Asia. It threatens food supplies for millions of people who depend on wheat and other small grains. Scientists have developed new wheat varieties with some resistance to the deadly disease, but the disease evolves and mutates into new forms, requiring new resistant varieties to be developed.

Several projects to develop resistance to Ug99 are under way, including an international consortium known as the Borlaug Global Rust Initiative, a $26 million, five-year effort funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. But the University of Minnesota economists estimate that as much as $51 million a year is needed. They arrived at that conclusion by estimating the economic losses that would likely have occurred without the 20th century research that kept earlier variations of the disease at bay.

"Failing to increase and sustain investments in rust-resistance research is tantamount to accepting an increase in the risk of yield losses on one of the world's food staples," said Phil Pardey, leader of the research team and a professor of applied economics at the University of Minnesota. "Spending on stem rust research has been inadequate for some time, and increased research investment must be sustained over the long haul if science is to keep on top of these ever-evolving crop diseases."

The University of Minnesota's work on wheat rust goes back to the early 20th century; one of its most famous alumni, Norman Borlaug, earned the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for his work on developing disease-resistant wheat. Today, scientists at the university are deeply involved in the Global Rust initiative and other related projects. The university is home to the world-renowned Cereal Disease Lab, where U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists work closely with U of M plant breeders and disease specialists on learning more about Ug99 and other diseases that affect grain production.


'/>"/>

Contact: Becky Beyers
bbeyers@umn.edu
612-626-5754
University of Minnesota
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New test for skin sensitization without using animals
2. Blind flies without recycling
3. A war without end -- with Earths carbon cycle held in the balance
4. Peering into living cells -- without dye nor fluophore
5. BUSM study shows potential of differentiated iPS cells in cell therapy without immune rejection
6. New way to kill lymphoma without chemotherapy
7. Solving puzzles without a picture
8. Not without my microbes
9. Bugs without borders
10. Production of FRP components without release agents
11. How bumblebees find efficient routes without a GPS
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/15/2016)... , Dec. 15, 2016   WaferGen Bio-systems, ... held genomics technology company, announced today that on December ... Qualifications Department of The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC which ... bid price of WaferGen,s common stock had been at ... WaferGen has regained compliance with Listing Rule 5550(a)(2) of ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... Dec. 14, 2016 "Increase in mobile transactions ... The mobile biometrics market is expected to grow from ... by 2022, at a CAGR of 29.3% between 2016 ... as the growing demand for smart devices, government initiatives, ... "Software component is expected to grow at a ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... -- According to a new market research report "Emotion Detection and ... Recognition), Service, Application Area, End User, And Region - Global Forecast to 2021", ... Billion in 2016 to USD 36.07 Billion by 2021, at a Compound Annual ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan. 18, 2017 The global biotechnology ... 92.9 billion by 2025, according to a new ... has been adaptive of the function of outsourcing ... 2002. Among the services outsourced, clinical trial management ... Johnson & Johnson was the first pharmaceutical company ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) (NYSE: BDX ), a ... live webcast of its Annual Meeting of Shareholders on Tuesday, January ... can be accessed from the BD corporate website at http://www.bd.com/investors/ ... ... BD is a global medical technology company that is ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017   Boston Biomedical ... compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, will feature ... compound, napabucasin, at the 2017 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, ... . Napabucasin is an orally-administered ... targeting STAT3. i Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... Clinical Ops Executives 2017 in its continued commitment to the advancement of the ... to discuss current issues related to clinical trial planning and management. , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: