Navigation Links
Why we have plenty of fish in the sea
Date:4/4/2012

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- New work from the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, with collaborators at Stanford University and five other groups, has pinpointed evolution in action.

By determining genomic sequence from many groups of stickleback fish, the scientists were able to show specific genomic changes leading to the ability of different fish populations to adapt to new environments. "We were pleased with the ability of genomics to show us what molecular changes are important in evolutionary processes," said Richard Myers, Ph.D., president and director of HudsonAlpha.

At the end of the last ice age, marine stickleback fish were present in many waters and then became separated into different populations in lakes and streams worldwide. These populations evolved separate traits, such as number of spines, body length or eye size, which allowed them to thrive in their specific habitat.

To tie these traits to specific DNA changes, the scientists generated a reference of the threespine stickleback fish genome at high quality. "With our reference genome and genetic map for stickleback, we will now be able to use it as a model organism for future studies of adaptation and environmental selection," said HudsonAlpha faculty investigator Jeremy Schmutz.

Scientists then sequenced 21 pairs of fish that varied at different traits and compared them to each other and to the reference fish genome. Small regions of the fish genome stood out due to changes in the genomic DNA, and many of these could be related to how the fish look and behave.

Two interesting findings stood out. First, the changes between fish populations often happened not by mutations in single DNA bases, but by inversions of very large chunks of DNA on fish chromosomes. When these large inversions of DNA occur, fish can no longer breed with each other effectively and start to become separate species.

Second, the scientists saw that when evolution allowing fish to adapt to their environment seemed to come from single DNA base changes, these were most often in regions of the genome that regulate genes and proteins, instead of in the genes themselves. In contrast, previous work has shown that in laboratory or domesticated animals, changes in genes and proteins are found more often.

Jane Grimwood, Ph.D., also a faculty investigator at HudsonAlpha, explained, "The predominance of regulatory changes in the evolution of sticklebacks suggests that natural populations may behave differently than domesticated animals, and our genetic mapping of many species will advance similar studies in natural and wild organisms."

HudsonAlpha researchers have been part of the NHGRI - NIH funded Center for Excellence in Genome Sciences, or CEGS, project for developing stickleback as a model organism since 2002. As part of this effort, they and colleagues at Stanford University have produced genomic resources for several freshwater and marine stickleback fish. Currently, the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center is building a reference sequence for the Y chromosome for stickleback, as the sequenced fish was a female.


'/>"/>

Contact: Chris Gunter
cgunter@hudsonalpha.org
356-327-0400
HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Illusion of plenty masking collapse of 2 key Southern California fisheries
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com ... Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... will focus on developing health and wellness apps that ... Hack the Genome is the first hackathon for ... world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech and health ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... N.Y. , March 27, 2017  Catholic ... Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for ... EMR Adoption Model sm . In addition, CHS ... of U.S. hospitals using an electronic medical record ... for its high level of EMR usage in ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... March 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , a ... technologies, today announced the release of the ... provides improved facial recognition using up to 10 ... single computer. The new version uses deep neural-network-based ... and it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... The AMA is happy to announce that $48,000 ... the nation. The scholarships are created through funds donated by model aviation organizations and ... set by the AMA Scholarship Committee, which is made up of model aviation pilots ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Frederick Innovative Technology ... of emerging technology-based businesses, recently earned a $77,518 grant from the Rural Maryland ... in 2004, FITCI is Frederick’s first incubator. A non-profit corporation, FITCI is a ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... April 20, 2017 , ... ... announced their strategic partnership to offer a full spectrum of digital security goods ... suite of biometric products and the ground-breaking proactive cybersecurity services and products through ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 20, 2017 , ... USDM ... for the life sciences and healthcare industries, is pleased to announce Holger Braemer ... established USDM subsidiary “USDM Europe GmbH” based in Germany. , Braemer is an ...
Breaking Biology Technology: