Navigation Links
Why do preterm deliveries pose cardiovascular risks for moms?
Date:1/10/2011

EAST LANSING, Mich. As the rate of preterm delivery rises accounting for 12.5 percent of all U.S. births a Michigan State University epidemiologist is using a $3.7 million federal grant to uncover why some mothers who deliver babies early are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Finding those links would help researchers identify which groups of women may benefit from early tracking and intervention, said Claudia Holzman, an epidemiology professor in MSU's College of Human Medicine who is collaborating with Janet Catov of the University of Pittsburgh on the study.

"As a group, women who have delivered a preterm infant have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, but the mechanisms responsible for that link are not understood," said Holzman, whose study is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

"We believe that pregnancy unmasks a predisposition to cardiovascular disease: Inflammation, an increase in lipids and the formation of blood clots during pregnancy may be related to preterm delivery and be indicators of later complications in some women who deliver preterm."

To research that hypothesis, Holzman and Catov will rely on the Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Health cohort, a group of more than 3,000 women enrolled in a study to examine the causes of preterm delivery. Holzman and colleagues began the POUCH study in 1998, and the cohort of women will be followed to study many different factors of preterm births in relation to the health of both children and mothers.

About 900 women (both who delivered preterm and those who did not) will be enrolled in the new study, Holzman said. The research team will study the cardiovascular profiles of women 6-11 years after they participated in the POUCH study, collecting data such as height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure, as well as blood levels of inflammatory markers, lipids and factors leading to blood clots.

Holzman said the team then will compare the data of women who delivered full-term babies with women who delivered preterm; researchers also will examine whether any association may be modified by factors such as race, socioeconomic status or maternal depression.

"Research that uncovers pathways linking preterm delivery to a mother's cardiovascular risk can lead to new treatment strategies for both problems," Holzman said. "If we can identify mothers very early in the process, we may be able to delay or prevent the onset of cardiovascular disease."

The women in the original POUCH study were patients at 52 clinics in five Michigan communities; researchers collected biological samples in mid-trimester, including blood, saliva, urine, hair and vaginal fluid. The placentas also were examined for pathologic markers linked to preterm deliveries.

The women also underwent detailed interviews and answered questionnaires about their lifestyles, home situations, economic status and perceived discrimination.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jason Cody
codyja@msu.edu
517-432-0924
Michigan State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Depression during pregnancy can double risk of preterm delivery
2. Uncultured bacteria found in amniotic fluids of women who experience preterm births
3. Preterm birth: Magnesium sulphate cuts cerebral palsy risk
4. Effectiveness of progesterone in reducing preterm births may be altered by genetic predisposition
5. March of Dimes provides $2.7 million in new funding for preterm birth research
6. HPV vaccine may prevent preterm births
7. Brain malformations significantly associated with preterm birth, Wake Forest research shows
8. Yale researchers may have uncovered the mechanism by which progesterone prevents preterm birth
9. New research shows genes of pregnant women and their fetuses can increase the risk of preterm labor
10. Prepregnancy, obesity and gestational weight gain influence risk of preterm birth
11. March of Dimes provides $2.6 million in new funding for preterm birth research
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Why do preterm deliveries pose cardiovascular risks for moms?
(Date:6/30/2017)... Today, American Trucking Associations announced Seeing ... and eye tracking software, became the newest member ... "Artificial intelligence and advanced sensing algorithms ... driver,s attentiveness levels while on the road.  Drivers ... fatigue and prevent potential accidents, which could lead ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... robotic gym for the rehabilitation and functional motor sense evaluation of lower ... . The first 30 robots will be available from June in ... The technology was developed and patented at the IIT laboratories and has ... to a 10 million euro investment from entrepreneur Sergio Dompè. ... ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... -- RAM Group , Singaporean based technology ... biometric authentication based on a novel  quantum-state ... perform biometric authentication. These new sensors are based on a ... Group and its partners. This sensor will have widespread ... security. Ram Group is a next generation sensor ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... , ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the ... Especially those living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , ... pollution-affected countries globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... Administration (FDA) has granted orphan drug designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal ... the treatment of osteosarcoma. SBT-100 is able to cross the cell membrane and ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today confirmed licensing rights that give ... Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in collaboration with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and CEO of ... Club. The event entitled “Stem Cells and Their Regenerative Powers,” was ... Dr. Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human doctors: Peter B. Hanson, M.D., ...
Breaking Biology Technology: