Navigation Links
When standard treatment fails: Jefferson to start unique immunotherapy for brain tumor patients
Date:12/14/2011

PHILADELPHIA -- Physicians at the Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience (JHN), the region's only dedicated hospital for neuroscience, are tackling a particularly aggressive brain cancer that even surgery, chemotherapy and radiation often fail to treat with a promising new immunotherapy to attack a patient's tumor with their own cancer cells.

Starting as early as January, the first of 12 patients diagnosed with a malignant astrocytoma from a clinical trial led by David W. Andrews, M.D., Co-Director of the Brain Tumor Center of the Kimmel Cancer Center at JHN, will receive a "cancer Trojan horse" that could significantly shrink their tumor and possibly extend their life.

Considering patients with malignant astrocytomas rarely live past four months, a new treatment method is highly needed.

Here's how the immunotherapy works. The patient's cancer cells are removed during surgery and then treated with a type of therapy that turns off a growth factor receptor, which plays a critical role in cell survival. Without it, cancer cells die.

Those same cells are then placed in a diffusion chamber (to keep the cells from spreading back into the body), re-implanted back into the patient within a day and then retrieved up to two days laterthis is what makes it stand out from other immunotherapies. During their time in the body, those reinserted, extracted tumor cells communicate a message to the other tumor cells to dieand tell the body's immune system to help do it.

Looking Back to Move Forward

The clinical trial comes off the heels of successful animal research and a pilot study at Jefferson that uncovered its benefits 10 years ago. In that study, eight of 10 patients treated with the immunotherapy had significant tumor shrinkage, with regression on a MRI. One man survived for eight years with no further treatment.

"The preclinical work and our own pilot study tell us that this novel treatment could have a significant impact on these cancer patients who don't have many options," Dr. Andrews said.

In the procedure, a patient's glioma cells are treated with an antisense therapy known as "18-mer type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotide" before they are placed back in the body. Antisense therapy is designed to target genes involved in cancer progression and came in to use 10 years ago.

Jefferson's approach differs from other immunotherapy strategies, with many advantages, Dr. Andrew said. In this design, the antigen (the treated cancer cells) is released slowly over a 24-hour period enabling many waves of immune cells known as dendritic cells to take up antigen and migrate to nearby lymph nodes, leaving no antigens for replacement dendritic cells. The most popular current approach involves injecting the patient's own dendritic cells as a single episode of inoculationa one and done.

"We feel that our approach will yield a very successful immunotherapy for these patients and perhaps other cancer patients as we open this trial," he said. "The previous data and our new Phase I clinical trial will hopefully guide us towards new standards of care."

Dr. Andrews will lead the new Phase I clinical trial, which will investigate the safety and feasibility of the immunotherapy, as well as progress in the 12 patients.

Leading the Way

Jefferson, which has an annual tumor volume that exceeds 1,000 cases, making it the busiest brain tumor practice in the tri-state area, is known for its leading clinical trials. That includes participation in a national tumor bank devoted to the genetic analysis of brain tumors (the TCGA project) and a slew of trials testing new combinations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for the treatment of a variety of brain cancers.

As authors and lead accruers to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9508, Jefferson established a new world standard of care for brain metastases in an article published in Lancet in 2004.

Currently, Jefferson is a leading participant in two RTOG trials, one investigating the use of Temozolomide, or TMZ, and radiation therapy with and without the chemotherapy drug bevacizumab in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastomas. The other is the RTOG spinal axis radiosurgery trial, which randomizes patients between conventional radiation and radiosurgery for treatment of symptomatic spinal axis metastases.

Maria Werner-Wasik, M.D., an Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, also co-directs the Brain Tumor Center at Jefferson.

Taking research to bedside is also part of Jefferson's overall mission for better patient care. Last year, in a game-changing article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, physicians discussed a treatment technique and results that extended the survival of patients with glioblastoma beyond any previously published results. That treatment, which is now available at Jefferson, delivers stereotactic boost radiotherapy to patients with malignant gliomas and has nearly doubled median survival time from 14 to 24 months.

"It's vital to this institution to constantly pursue new treatments for these very serious tumors where current treatments often have minimal impact with modest survival benefit," Dr. Andrews said. "It's just one example of how the multidisciplinary team at Jefferson, which includes neurosurgeons, neuropathologists, neuro-oncologists, radiation oncologists, and neuro-immunologists, tackles brain tumor research. We strive to apply new knowledge to take better care of the hundreds and hundreds of patients that come through our doors."


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@jefferson.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. ATS statement regarding White House decision to delay new ozone standard
2. Its your standard pilot project: NIST to offer documentary standards to first responders
3. Inverting a standard experiment sometimes produces different results
4. NIST prototypes framework for evaluating sustainability standards
5. Study examines folic acid absorption rates from softgel capsule and standard tablet
6. ESHRE sets standards for cross-border reproductive care
7. IOF-ISCD collaboration to create courses setting highest standards in diagnostic training
8. Advertising Research Foundation Develops Standards for Neuromarketing Research
9. Quality standards for biological, chemical drugs and public health are focus of India meeting
10. Standardized protocols would greatly enhance clinical and research potential of BTMs
11. New standard proposed for supercomputing
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
When standard treatment fails: Jefferson to start unique immunotherapy for brain tumor patients
(Date:4/3/2017)... 3, 2017  Data captured by IsoCode, ... detected a statistically significant association between the ... treatment and objective response of cancer patients ... predict whether cancer patients will respond to ... well as to improve both pre-infusion potency testing ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University ... adopting ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, pushing ... for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of access ... ... A research team led by Dr Ajay ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017  higi, the health IT company that ... North America , today announced a Series B ... of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition accelerates higi,s ... to transform population health activities through the collection and ... higi collects and secures data today on behalf ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... 27, 2017 , ... Indiana-based Xylogenics announced today the release ... process. The efficiencies created by the newest strain design will have an ... industry wherein individual production plants are planning to invest upwards of $350 million ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... ... The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) , the nation’s leading nonprofit ... and a statutory advisor to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), ... Coordinator for Health Information Technology, will deliver the keynote at its 2017 Summer Forum ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 , ... Ken Hanson, ... president of Physik Instrumente USA, have been selected as this year’s recipients of two ... The two have been invited along with other honorees to accept their awards at ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... Colorado (PRWEB) , ... June 21, 2017 , ... ... RTP regional office in North Carolina, and engages Timothy Reinhardt to manage the ... of quality leadership at Pfizer Inc, with his most recent role as the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: