Navigation Links
When a KISS (1) goes bad

KISS 1 is a metastasis-suppressor gene which helps to prevent the spread of cancers, including melanoma, pancreatic and ovarian cancers to name a few. But new research from Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry shows that kisspeptins peptide products of KISS1, actually make some breast cancers worse, with a higher tumor grade and metastatic potential. The research is published online in the journal Endocrinology.

Moshmi Bhattacharya, an associate professor in the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, and Oncology, was surprised to find high levels of kisspeptins in aggressive breast cancers. "We found kisspeptins could turn non-invasive cancer cells into invasive cells, and therefore could be playing a role in the metastasis of breast cancer."

The paper's first author Donna Cvetkovic, a graduate student working with Bhattacharya, says they were also able to pinpoint what triggered kisspeptin to act in this unusual fashion. "Typically breast cancers are classified as being estrogen receptor-positive or estrogen receptor-negative. In estrogen receptor-negative cells we found that kisspeptin significantly increased invasiveness. However in cells that still expressed estrogen, kisspeptin does not lead to invasion," says Cvetkovic. "We believe that estrogen is acting as a brake, and when patients lose their estrogen receptor, it allows kisspeptin to behave in a non-typical fashion."

"As for clinical applications, testing to see whether the kisspeptin receptor is present or not, could provide us with an idea of whether the breast cancer will become more aggressive and thereby more metastatic," says Bhattacharya, a New Investigator with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) which funded this study. She also believes kisspeptins could be a good therapeutic target.


Contact: Kathy Wallis
519-661-2111 x81136
University of Western Ontario

Page: 1

Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/27/2016)... June 27, 2016 Research and Markets has ... 2016-2020" report to their offering. ... America to grow at a CAGR of 12.28% during ... based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. ... the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... 22, 2016  The American College of Medical Genetics and ... Magazine as one of the fastest-growing trade shows during ... the Bellagio in Las Vegas . ... of growth in each of the following categories: net square ... number of attendees. The 2015 ACMG Annual Meeting was ranked ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... 22, 2016   Acuant , the ... solutions, has partnered with RightCrowd ® ... Visitor Management, Self-Service Kiosks and Continuous Workforce ... add functional enhancements to existing physical access ... venues with an automated ID verification and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... While the majority of commercial spectrophotometers and ... and the 6000i models are higher end machines that use the more unconventional z-dimension ... light beam from the bottom of the cuvette holder. , FireflySci has developed ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... to announce the launch of their brand, UP4™ Probiotics, into Target stores nationwide. ... years, is proud to add Target to its list of well-respected retailers. This ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- A person commits a crime, and the detective uses ... criminal down. An outbreak of foodborne illness makes ... uses DNA evidence to track down the bacteria that caused ... not. The FDA has increasingly used a complex, cutting-edge technology ... Put as simply as possible, whole genome sequencing is a ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is pleased to announce 24 ... for prostate cancer. Members of the Class of 2016 were selected from a ... Read More About the Class of 2016 PCF Young Investigators ... ... ...
Breaking Biology Technology: