Navigation Links
Wayne State receives grant to advance ecological restoration efforts in the Great Lakes
Date:3/21/2014

DETROIT Foreign mussels hitchhiking to the Great Lakes in the ballast water tanks of international freighters are becoming one of the most vexing environmental problems facing the Great Lakes. A group of scientists from Wayne State University, in collaboration with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Environmental Protection Agency, are working together to battle this problem.

This invasion of zebra mussels and quagga mussels have caused dramatic ecological effects on the Great Lakes' ecosystems, including changes in fish abundance, local extinction of native mussels and profound changes in benthic invertebrates, organisms that live on the bottom of bodies of water that are important to decomposition of organic matter and more.

With the help of a grant from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), scientists from Wayne State University are heading up research to help identify a chemical found in algae that may inhibit spawning in the invasive zebra and quagga mussels. The research, led by Donna Kashian, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Jeffrey Ram, professor of physiology in the School of Medicine, will work to identify these chemical cues released by algae and determine how they can be used to develop an ecological-scale control strategy to disrupt reproduction.

"Our preliminary research has demonstrated that algae produce chemicals that can stimulate or inhibit zebra and quagga mussels spawning," said Kashian. "The stimulatory chemicals may be the normal triggers of spawning that signal when conditions are amenable to larval development, whereas the inhibitory algal chemicals may be protective or toxic signals that prevent predation by mussel adults and larvae."

Because of this preliminary research, they are working to identify and deploy algal chemicals which are potentially species-specific natural products to regulate mussel reproduction to reduce their populations at ecosystem scales.

"Instead of focusing on toxic, non-specific chemicals to kill mussels, such as those used in water treatment facilities and power stations, we hope inhibit them by natural chemical cues released by algae that ultimately will disrupt reproduction," added Kashian.

The grant was funded through the USGS from the EPA's Great Lakes Restoration Initiative with a first year total of $135,000, and an anticipated overall total of nearly $320,000. The grant's cooperative agreement number is G14AC00017.


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Research led by Wayne State discovers single gene in bees separating queens from workers
2. Wayne State discovers potential treatment for better heart health in hemodialysis patients
3. Wayne State cholesterol study shows algal extracts may counter effects of high fat diets
4. Wayne State discovers potential treatment for skin and corneal wound healing in diabetics
5. Wayne State researchers discover specific inhibitor for rheumatoid arthritis treatment
6. Wayne State receives grant to reduce emissions of toxins by power plants into Great Lakes
7. Wayne State receives NSF grant to develop plan for field-based water research center
8. Wayne State welcomes undergraduates from around the US for physics research experience
9. Wayne State University startup, Advaita, to participate in new Michigan I-Corps program
10. Wayne State vision restoration technology receives Notice of Allowance for US patent app
11. Wayne State study shows airborne dust in urban areas impacts lead levels in children
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/15/2016)... , April 15, 2016  A new partnership ... more accurate underwriting decisions in a fraction of ... competitively priced and high-value life insurance policies to ... With Force Diagnostics, rapid testing (A1C, ... data readings (blood pressure, weight, pulse, BMI, and ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... CHICAGO , April 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians ... are setting a new clinical standard in telehealth ... By leveraging the higi platform, IMPOWER patients can ... weight, pulse and body mass index, and, when they ... quick and convenient visit to a local retail location ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... , March 29, 2016 ... "Company") LegacyXChange "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to ... ink used in a variety of writing instruments, ensuring ... of originally created collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange will ... analysis of the DNA. Bill Bollander ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Researchers at the Universita ... miRNAs in people with peritoneal or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are the subject of ... now. , Diagnostic biomarkers are signposts in the blood, lung fluid or tissue ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016   Boston Biomedical , an ... designed to target cancer stemness pathways, announced that ... Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. Food and ... cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Napabucasin is ... inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting STAT3, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital ... Sports Association to serve as their official health ... Methodist Willowbrook will provide sponsorship support, athletic training ... association coaches, volunteers, athletes and families. ... Sports Association and to bring Houston Methodist quality ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- The Biodesign Challenge (BDC), a university competition that asks ... systems and biotechnology, announced its winning teams at the ... York City . The teams, chosen ... MoMA,s Celeste Bartos Theater during the daylong summit. Keynote ... of architecture and design, and Suzanne Lee , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: