Navigation Links
Wakame waste
Date:5/1/2008

Bacteria that feed on seaweed could help in the disposal of pollutants in the world's oceans, according to a new study by researchers in China and Japan. The discovery is reported in the International Journal of Biotechnology, an Inderscience publication.

Shinichi Nagata of the Environmental Biochemistry Group, at Kobe University, Japan, working with colleagues at Shimane University and at Nankai University, China, explain that as marine pollution is on the increase novel approaches to removing toxic contaminants is becoming an increasingly pressing issue. They point out that various species of seaweed are able to extract toxic compounds from seawater and point to the brown seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida, known as wakame in Japan as having been the focus of research in this area for almost a decade.

Wakame can thrive evening the presence of carbon, ammonium, nitrate and phosphate in sea water that would otherwise be lifeless. However, there remains the problem of how to dispose of planted wakame, once it has feasted on organic and inorganic pollutants in seawater.

Organic pollutants are absorbed by cultured wakame and so cultivated wakame must be treated as a kind of toxic waste rather than a useful byproduct of marine bioremediation. The researchers point out that there may be a simple solution to the disposal problem. Natural wakame has been used as a fertilizer since ancient times, they explain, so the composting process could be an effective means of degrading wakame into a useful form and so recycling organic substances containing C, N and P from coastal waters.

The team has now found a highly efficient way to accelerate the composting process in the form of a novel marine bacterium, identified as a Halomonas species and given the label AW4.

Partial DNA analysis helped identify the active species isolated from the seaweeds in Awaji Island, Japan. The researchers explain that strain AW4 grows well even at high salt (sodium chloride) concentrations and can reduce the total organic components, including pollutant content, of the seaweed significantly within a week.


'/>"/>

Contact: Shinichi Nagata
nagata@maritime.kobe-u.ac.jp
Inderscience Publishers
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Dental chair a possible source of neurotoxic mercury waste
2. Key to using local resources for biomass may include waste
3. U of Minnesota researchers discover key for converting waste to electricity
4. Managing nuclear wastes for the millennia
5. Where does stored nuclear waste go?
6. Great potential to improve collection, recycling of Europes electronic waste, says UN report
7. Central targets may hinder wider waste management objectives
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/30/2017)... Va. , June 30, 2017 ... leading developer and supplier of face and eye ... ATA Featured Product provider program. ... an innovative way to monitor a driver,s attentiveness ... greatly from being able to detect fatigue and ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... May 23, 2017  Hunova, the first robotic gym for the rehabilitation ... officially launched in Genoa, Italy . The first 30 ... and the USA . The technology was developed and ... by the IIT spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to a 10 million euro ... Release, please click: ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... , May 5, 2017 RAM ... announced a new breakthrough in biometric authentication based ... quantum mechanical properties to perform biometric authentication. These new ... semiconductor material created by Ram Group and its ... entertainment, transportation, supply chains and security. Ram Group ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/11/2017)... ... August 11, 2017 , ... ... and, in particular, more natural alternatives to synthetic ingredients,” said Matt Hundt, President ... Wave, with the established manufacturing presence and know-how of Biorigin will allow us ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) , ... August 09, 2017 ... ... back to the classroom next week-- as students. From August 14th through the ... Institute. The institute, which debuted in the summer of 2016, provides Philadelphia-based middle ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... ... August 09, 2017 , ... Each year in the United States ... enough to live an independent lifestyle and, even worse, the one-year mortality rate is ... doctors at the University of California Davis Medical Center (Sacramento) and Second Xiangya Hospital ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... California, USA (PRWEB) , ... August 09, 2017 ... ... has partnered with four international biomedical optics laboratories — the Wellman Center for ... Hospital, Medical Laser Center Lübeck and the Beckman Laser Institute at University of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: