Navigation Links
WHO guidelines on Buruli ulcer need adjustment
Date:6/18/2010

Buruli ulcers, one of the 'neglected tropical diseases' left aside by big pharma and governments alike, are reasonably well treatable, also in poor regions. But then more attention has to be paid to early diagnosis and correct treatment. This means the rules of the World Health Organization urgently need to be changed. So say scientists of the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), based on ten years of research in Congo.

The disease is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, a nephew of the infamous tuberculosis bacterium. It occurs in tropical and subtropical countries, mainly in Africa. It causes hideously ulcerating 'holes' in the skin, that can dig to the bone and can outgrow to diameters of more than 10 centimetres. Much about the disease is unknown, for instance how exactly people get infected. It is assumed that water plays a role, but only in 2008 scientists at ITM succeeded in cultivating the bacterium from a water insect.

For a long time the only treatment consisted of caring for the wounds, and possibly a skin transplantation. Nowadays the WHO proposes a treatment analogous to tuberculosis, with two antibiotics, rifampicin and streptomycin. This works for light cases, but for lesions above 10 cm the effect was not documented. ITM scientist Anatole Kibadi Kapay collected cases in DR Congo from the previous five years, when surgery combined with antibiotics was used, and from the five year before that, when only surgery was used. In the process he discovered a new focus close to the Angolan border; he assumes it to be correlated to the working conditions in the illegal diamond mines there.

Kibadi Kapay noticed that the WHO guidelines for clinical diagnosis lead to a correct diagnosis in only 2 cases out of 3. As opposed to a Ziehl-Neelsen smear, a microscopic technique that is within reach of poor countries and that, through a better diagnosis, prevents the needless use of antibiotics.

But when large wounds have to be treated, from a microscopically confirmed Buruli case, antibiotics indeed are of good use. With surgery only, 15% of patients relapse; with parallel use of antibiotics, less than 2% relapse. But antibiotics only, without surgery, make large wounds worse.

Kibadi Kapay who today received a doctorate from Antwerp University for his work and his ITM colleagues advocate faster surgery of large ulcerating lesions, without four weeks of waiting with antibiotics only. The more because patients themselves already wait a long time before consulting a doctor to them the ulcers are inflicted by witchcraft or fate.

The research by Kibadi Kapay demonstrates the need of a better education of the population, but more important, it shows that WHO guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcers urgently need to be adapted.


'/>"/>

Contact: Anatole Kibadi Kapay
akibadi@yahoo.fr
32-485-477-564
Institute for Tropical Medicine Antwerp
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UNC study questions FDA genetic-screening guidelines for cancer drug
2. 2 carotid artery stenting studies show results comparable to AHA guidelines
3. Simple screening questionnaire for kidney disease outperforms current clinical practice guidelines
4. NHLBI issues first US von Willebrand Disease clinical practice guidelines
5. New guidelines for treating rheumatoid arthritis
6. Study finds ATV guidelines inadequate
7. Guidelines urge physical activity during pregnancy
8. The International Society for Stem Cell Research releases new guidelines
9. Publication sets guidelines across cancer therapies: Ensuring the best in patient management
10. Coral Disease Handbook: Guidelines for Assessment, Monitoring and Management
11. First comprehensive guidelines for managing medullary thyroid carcinoma published in Thyroid journal
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... First quarter 2016:   , ... the first quarter of 2015 The gross margin was ... 18.8) and the operating margin was 40% (-13) Earnings ... flow from operations was SEK 249.9 M (21.2) , ... SEK 7,000-8,500 M. The operating margin for 2016 is ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... April 15, 2016 Research ... Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their offering.  ... ) , ,The global gait biometrics market is ... during the period 2016-2020. Gait analysis ... can be used to compute factors that are ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... 2016 LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: ... SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to announce our successful effort ... variety of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against counterfeiting ... from athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ongoing ... Bill Bollander , CEO states, "By ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... PathSensors, Inc., ... Advisory Board. Dr. Lamka will assist PathSensors in expanding the use of the ... deploys the CANARY® test platform for the detection of harmful pathogens, including a ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... April 27, 2016 MedDay, a biotechnology ... announces the appointment of Catherine Moukheibir as Chairman of its ... Chairman, Jean Jacques Garaud , who contributed to the ... effective immediately. Catherine started her career in strategy ... and London .  She held C-Suite level ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... April 26, 2016 , ... ... Herr has been selected as one of three finalists for the European Inventor ... the EPO’s annual innovation prize will be announced at a ceremony in Lisbon on ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ... April 26, 2016 , ... BioFactura, Inc ., a ... round of financing. Healthy investor interest drove significant oversubscription of the original $1.5M ... known as biosimilars, to the advanced preclinical stages. , Chief Executive Officer and President, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: