Navigation Links
Virtual vehicle vibrations
Date:2/11/2013

"Sit up straight in your chair!"

That command given by countless parents to their children may one day be delivered by vehicle designers to a robot that is actually a computerized model of a long-distance truck driver or other heavy equipment operator, thanks to a University of Iowa research program.

That's because a UI researcher has designed a computer program that allows engineers to accurately predict the role posture plays in transferring the stress of vehicle motion to bone and muscle in the head and neck.

Titled "Human head-neck models in whole-body vibration: Effect of posture," the paper is published in the online Jan. 3 issue of the Journal of Biomechanics.

Lead author Salam Rahmatalla, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and research engineer at the Virtual Soldier Research (VSR) Program, a part of the College of Engineering's Center for Computer-Aided Design (CCAD), says that a computer model is needed.

"Studies have shown that awkward head-neck postures inside whole-body vibration environments can increase discomfort and the risk of injury," he says. "The goal of this project is to introduce a computerized human model that can be used to predict human motion in response to whole-body vibration when the human takes different head-neck postures."

He notes that the predicted motion data of his current model can be used to drive more sophisticated computer human modelswith muscles and internal tissuesthat can predict muscle forces and internal strain and stress between tissues and vertebrae.

Significantly, the computer program may reduce the need for actual human subjects to drive test vehicles.

"One major benefit of the current computer human model is the possibility of using it instead of humans in the design/modification loop of equipment in whole-body vibration," he says.

Rahmatalla says a wide variety of industry, university, and other researcher venues likely will learn from his work.

"The automotive industry, and manufacturers of heavy machinery including construction, agriculture, mining, and military vehicles can benefit from the application of this model to the design of their equipment," he says.

"Also, human factors researchers and ergonomists can use this model to investigate the effect of head-neck posture on human response, performance, human machine interaction, and injury risk in whole-body vibration."

Rahmatalla's long-term VSR objective is to develop a virtual human capable of reproducing complex human responses to a whole body vibration environment that will help answer questions related to potential injury risks and design modifications.

Rahmatalla conducted the study by having 11 male participants sit in a vehicle simulator where they were subjected to white-noise random vibration and the acceleration data of the head and neck for each was recorded. The recorded motion data was used to calibrate the computer human model.

His colleague in the study was Yang Wang, a student in the UI Graduate College and CCAD graduate research assistant.


'/>"/>

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UT Dallas researchers pushing the boundaries of virtual reality
2. Virtual women reveal more skin, regardless of body proportions
3. U of M to lead international virtual institute studying climatic and human effects on Earth
4. VirtualScopics Schedules Third Quarter 2012 Earnings Announcement
5. University of Tennessee Space Institute researchers make clinical trials a virtual reality
6. Darwin discovered to be right: Eastern Pacific barrier is virtually impassable by coral species
7. Scripps Research scientists show potent new compound virtually eliminates HIV in cell culture
8. Virtual plant planning, retrofitting and maintenance
9. A virtual crystal ball
10. Real science in virtual school labs
11. High capacity vehicles the future?
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/13/2017)... MONICA, Calif. , April 13, 2017 ... New York will feature emerging and evolving ... Summits. Both Innovation Summits will run alongside the expo ... of speaker sessions, panels and demonstrations focused on trending ... coast,s largest advanced design and manufacturing event will take ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... April 11, 2017 No two people ... at the New York University Tandon School of ... have found that partial similarities between prints are ... in mobile phones and other electronic devices can ... The vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 5, 2017 Today HYPR ... that the server component of the HYPR platform is ... providing the end-to-end security architecture that empowers biometric authentication ... HYPR has already secured over 15 million users across ... manufacturers of connected home product suites and physical access ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... sector professionals, has announced the addition of 5 new courses to its prospectus. ... Compliance with Regulation 21 CFR Part 11 on Electronic Records and Electronic Signatures ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... Lajollacooks4u welcomed the San Diego chapter of Les ... society of professional women with high achievement in the fields of food, fine beverage ... , Twelve members began with an olive oil tasting to whet their palettes and ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... , ... September 20, 2017 , ... ... collaboration with Koch Agronomic Services (Koch) to feature new innovations aimed at helping ... broadcast first quarter 2018. American Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. Check ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... ... Diversity focused business accelerator, The Refinery , announced today they are hosting ... technology-driven, women-led startups in Boston, MA, New Haven/Hamden, CT, and Newark, NJ. Fueling ... that week – in Boston, it will be part of the City of Boston's ...
Breaking Biology Technology: