Navigation Links
VC predicts the motion of the ocean
Date:11/5/2013

ANU Vice-Chancellor, Professor Ian Young AO, has just published research that will help you every morning with the surf report.

Research led by the Vice-Chancellor will allow oceanographers and meteorologists to better predict the rate at which ocean swells decay, or deteriorate, as they travel across the globe.

"Ocean cargo shipping, offshore oil and gas production, and even recreational activities such as surfing, are all dependent on wave action," says Professor Young.

"It is therefore critical that we are able to predict swell."

It is estimated that 75 per cent of waves across the world are not actually generated by local winds. Instead, they are driven by distant storms which propagate as swell.

"Imagine you drop a rock in a pond. Waves radiate out from the rock. You don't need anything to push the waves. Once generated, they propagate by themselves.

"So, for most of the Indian, Pacific and South Atlantic oceans, it is actually the weather in the Southern Ocean thousands of kilometres away that dominates the wave conditions," explains Professor Young.

"The Southern Ocean is dominated by big low pressure systems that move across it year round. These systems generate waves that then grow and can travel tens of thousands of kilometres from where they were actually formed, to crash on a beach in Australia."

Professor Young, who is affiliated with the Research School of Earth Sciences, used orbiting satellites to track swell generated in the Southern Ocean and measure the rate of decay as it travelled north towards Australia.

The results showed that the decay of the swell depends on how steep the wave actually is.

"Steep waves decay very quickly. However, typical swell is not very steep and can travel across oceanic basins with only a relatively small loss of energy."

Over 200 individual cases were tracked, making this study the first to provide such comprehensive data of this decay.

"What we were able to do is track the swell from the satellite as it moved from the south to the north, some 1400 kilometres. We only chose cases where there was no wind so that we could be confident that all we were measuring was the swell decay.

"We can take these results and put them into a mathematical formula that can be put straight into computer models used by national weather bureaus.

"This will increase our ability to better predict wave action. As 70 per cent of the world's oceans are dominated by swell, it's extremely important to be able to predict them accurately."


'/>"/>

Contact: ANU Media Hotline
media@anu.edu.au
61-026-125-7979
Australian National University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Computer model predicts red blood cell flow
2. UT Arlington engineer to design prototype that predicts flash flooding
3. New study predicts rising irrigation costs, reduced yields for US corn
4. Cleveland Clinic research shows gut bacteria byproduct predicts heart attack and stroke
5. APL novel method accurately predicts disease outbreaks
6. Imaging biomarker predicts response to rapid antidepressant
7. University of Tennessee study predicts extreme climate in Eastern US
8. New research predicts rising trend in Indias Violent Land Conflicts; 130 districts struggle
9. Disaster map predicts bleak future for mammals
10. Outside a vacuum: Model predicts movement of charged particles in complex media
11. Genetic test predicts risk for Autism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2016)... Florida , March 29, 2016 ... the "Company") LegacyXChange "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased ... in ink used in a variety of writing instruments, ... Buyers of originally created collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange ... forensic analysis of the DNA. Bill ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... India , March 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... market research report "Electronic Sensors Market for Consumer ... Proximity, & Others), Application (Communication & IT, ... Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published ... industry is expected to reach USD 26.76 ...
(Date:3/21/2016)... Massachusetts , March 22, 2016 ... facial recognition with passcodes for superior security   ... ), a leading provider of secure digital communications services, ... their biometric technology and offer enterprise customers, particularly those ... secure facial recognition and voice authentication within a mobile ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Proove Biosciences, ... to announce the launch of the Proove Health Foundation . The Foundation ... to promote the use of personalized medicine for tackling the nation’s most-pressing healthcare ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Intelligent Implant ... by the FDA via 510(k) for sale in the United States. These components ... posterior thoraco-lumbar fusions. With one-level sales beginning in October of 2015, the company ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... deliver a talk on its first-in-class technologies for tissue stem cell counting and ... on RNAiMicroRNA Biology to Reprogramming & CRISPR-based Genome Engineering in Burlington, Massachusetts. , ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to ... been a volunteer member of Committee since 1987. Since then, he has served in ... treasurer and was chairman for both the program and exposition committees. In his professional ...
Breaking Biology Technology: