Navigation Links
Used-cigarette butts offer energy storage solution
Date:8/5/2014

A group of scientists from South Korea have converted used-cigarette butts into a high-performing material that could be integrated into computers, handheld devices, electrical vehicles and wind turbines to store energy.

Presenting their findings today, 5 August 2014, in IOP Publishing's journal Nanotechnology, the researchers have demonstrated the material's superior performance compared to commercially available carbon, graphene and carbon nanotubes.

It is hoped the material can be used to coat the electrodes of supercapacitorselectrochemical components that can store extremely large amounts of electrical energywhilst also offering a solution to the growing environmental problem caused by used-cigarette filters.

It is estimated that as many as 5.6 trillion used-cigarettes, or 766,571 metric tons, are deposited into the environment worldwide every year.

Co-author of the study Professor Jongheop Yi, from Seoul National University, said: "Our study has shown that used-cigarette filters can be transformed into a high-performing carbon-based material using a simple one step process, which simultaneously offers a green solution to meeting the energy demands of society.

"Numerous countries are developing strict regulations to avoid the trillions of toxic and non-biodegradable used-cigarette filters that are disposed of into the environment each yearour method is just one way of achieving this."

Carbon is the most popular material that supercapacitors are composed of, due to its low cost, high surface area, high electrical conductivity and long term stability.

Scientists around the world are currently working towards improving the characteristics of supercapacitorssuch as energy density, power density and cycle stabilitywhilst also trying to reduce production costs.

In their study, the researchers demonstrated that the cellulose acetate fibres that cigarette filters are mostly composed of could be transformed into a carbon-based material using a simple, one-step burning technique called pyrolysis.

As a result of this burning process, the resulting carbon-based material contained a number of tiny pores, increasing its performance as a supercapacitive material.

"A high-performing supercapacitor material should have a large surface area, which can be achieved by incorporating a large number of small pores into the material," continued Professor Yi.

"A combination of different pore sizes ensures that the material has high power densities, which is an essential property in a supercapacitor for the fast charging and discharging."

Once fabricated, the carbon-based material was attached to an electrode and tested in a three-electrode system to see how well the material could adsorb electrolyte ions (charge) and then release electrolyte ions (discharge).

The material stored a higher amount of electrical energy than commercially available carbon and also had a higher amount of storage compared to graphene and carbon nanotubes, as reported in previous studies.


'/>"/>
Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Dissolvable fabric loaded with medicine might offer faster protection against HIV
2. Decades-old amber collection offers new views of a lost world
3. Pfenex Inc. Announces Pricing Of Initial Public Offering
4. UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies
5. Studying estrogens made by the brain may offer new insights in learning and memory
6. Nanotechnology for a sustainable future, new book offers insights
7. New driver of atherosclerosis offers potential as therapeutic target
8. Small businesses less likely to offer health promotion programs
9. Grape consumption may offer benefits for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis
10. iPhone app offers quick and inexpensive melanoma screening
11. Penn State researchers believe ants can offer human-disease insights
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/11/2017)... 11, 2017 Intoxalock, a leading ignition interlock ... of its patent-pending calibration device. With this new technology, ... securely upload data logs and process repairs at service ... "Fighting drunk driving through the application of cutting-edge ... large, but also for the customer who can get ...
(Date:1/6/2017)...  Delta ID Inc., a leader in consumer-grade iris ... at CES® 2017. Delta ID has collaborated with Gentex ... use of iris scanning as a secure, reliable and ... a car, and as a way to elevate the ... Delta ID and Gentex will demonstrate (booth #7326 LVCC) ...
(Date:12/22/2016)... , Dec. 20, 2016  As part of its longstanding ... leading personal genetics company, recently released its latest children,s book, ... The book focuses on the topics of inheritance and variation ... Standards (NGSS) taught in elementary school classrooms in the US. ... series by illustrator Ariana Killoran , whose previous book ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... AxioMed will be presenting its viscoelastic cervical ... Montego Bay, Jamaica from January 26-28th. “We’re excited to be presenting the benefits ... the simplicity of the surgical technique,” said Jake Lubinski, President of AxioMed. ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... G&L Scientific Inc, a leading provider ... ), has announced the opening of new offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, strengthening and ... This is the latest step in G&L’s expansion of its global clinical consulting ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... January 21, 2017 , ... ... our ongoing endeavors to bring to market a pioneering medical device for the ... has signed an engagement contract with Emergo, a global regulatory consultancy that helps ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... BOULDER, Colo. , Jan. 20, 2017 ... ("Bioptix" or the "Company"), announced that on January 14, ... a plan under which the Company will terminate certain ... subsidiary, Bioptix Diagnostics, Inc.  The Company commenced terminations on ... completed within 30 days.  The Company may pay severance ...
Breaking Biology Technology: