Navigation Links
University of Missouri completes first drought simulator
Date:8/18/2011

COLUMBIA, Mo. Historically, droughts have had devastating effects on agriculture, causing famine and increasing consumer food costs. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR) have completed two drought simulators designed to test the effects of water deficiency on crops. The simulators are located at the University of Missouri's Bradford Research and Extension Center east of Columbia.

AUDIO: With new drought simulators, University of Missouri researchers will be able to study plants, such as corn and soybeans, and test their drought resistance in the field.

Click here for more information.

The simulators, part of a $1.5 million Missouri Life Sciences Research Board grant, are essentially mobile greenhouses measuring 50 feet by 100 feet. To simulate drought, researchers move the greenhouses over plants when it is raining and move them away from plants when it is sunny. A test plot of the same plants will be kept next to the simulator to provide a comparison. The drought simulators will increase the real-world application of scientific research, as they allow researchers to more closely mimic actual drought conditions.

When funding is available, additional simulators will be built at the Delta Research Center in Portageville, Mo., in the southeastern part of the state, and at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center in New Franklin, Mo. These locations represent a variety of environments, crop species and soil types, allowing researchers to test any agriculturally important crop, forage and turf species grown in Missouri and surrounding states.

"This network of drought simulators will be unlike any other network in the U.S., providing Missouri scientists with state-of-the-art field facilities to conduct a broad range of drought-related research," said Felix Fritschi, assistant professor in the CAFNR Division of Plant Sciences. "Our objective is to develop real-world products and practices to improve food security and increase profitability for farmers."

"The ability to manage the timing, duration and intensity of water-deficit stress under field conditions is essential to examine plant responses to drought," said Bob Sharp, a co-investigator and director of MU's Interdisciplinary Plant Group. "Thus, the drought simulators will bridge the gap between controlled-environment facilities, such as growth chambers and greenhouses, and real conditions encountered in the field."

Thirteen co-investigators from several disciplines, including water quality, soil biology, soil physics, plant-insect and plant-disease interaction, and plant breeding, genetics and plant root biology will collaborate on the project. Another focus area is tissue dehydration tolerance. Researchers plan to study the genetic characteristics of plants that are extremely tolerant to dry climates and how these characteristics might be used to improve commercial crops.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christian Basi
BasiC@missouri.edu
573-882-4430
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. ASHG awards $10,000 genetics education research grant to Maurice Godfrey of University of Nebraska
2. University of Colorado Cancer Center genetically sequences most common bladder cancer
3. Durham University solar car takes on World Solar Challenge
4. University of Virginia researchers uncover new catalysis site
5. Montana State University team surprised by results of lung, mold study
6. Hebrew University student turns paper mill waste into green material for industrial applications
7. University of Houston professor co-authors PNAS paper on how bacteria move
8. Changing Planet town hall at Arizona State University: Adapting to our water future
9. Moessbauer group of Mainz University preparing for participation in Japanese moon mission
10. University of Kentucky-led research could be path to new energy sources
11. University of Houston researcher an author of multi-institutional genetic study of ovarian cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
University of Missouri completes first drought simulator
(Date:5/12/2016)... 2016 WearablesResearch.com , a brand of ... results from the Q1 wave of its quarterly wearables ... consumers, receptivity to a program where they would receive ... insurance company. "We were surprised to see ... Michael LaColla , CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily because ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... and LONDON , April 26, ... of EdgeVerve Systems, a product subsidiary of Infosys ... announced a partnership to integrate the Onegini mobile ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151104/283829LOGO ) ... customers enhanced security to access and transact across ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... 2016 BioCatch ™, the ... announced the appointment of Eyal Goldwerger as ... Goldwerger,s leadership appointment comes at a time of ... deployment of its platform at several of the world,s ... discerns unique cognitive and physiological factors, is a winner ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... The ... by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) outlining a ... clinically relevant data were available when and where it was needed. The organization ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... Biohaven Pharmaceutical ... (FDA) has granted the company’s orphan drug designation request covering BHV-4157 for the ... granted by the FDA. , Spinocerebellar ataxia is a rare, debilitating neurodegenerative ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... Maryland (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... of a newly re-branded identity. The new Media Cybernetics corporate branding reflects a ... world of imaging and image analysis. The re-branding components include a crisp, refreshed ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... 2016 Oxitec CEO Hadyn Parry ... 10:15 a.m. ET before the United States House Committee on ... can play in controlling the spread of the Aedes ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150630/227348 ) ... self-limiting gene. Trials in Brazil , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: