Navigation Links
University of Minnesota discovery suggests a new way to prevent HIV from infecting human cells
Date:12/22/2010

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have discovered how HIV binds to and destroys a specific human antiviral protein called APOBEC3F. The results suggest that a simple chemical change can convert APOBEC3F to a more effective antiviral agent and that shielding of a common feature shared by related proteins may yield a similar outcome.

This discovery highlights the potential for a novel approach to combating HIV/AIDS that would seek to stabilize and harness the innate antiviral activity of certain human proteins, according to lead author John Albin, a researcher in the laboratory of Reuben Harris, associate professor of biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics in the College of Biological Sciences.

The finding was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. For a copy of the abstract and/or full article, contact Preston Smith or John Albin.

Human cells produce a family of antiviral proteins (called APOBECs) that have the unique and natural ability to destroy HIV. But HIV has evolved a way to overcome restriction using an accessory protein called Vif (virion infectivity factor) to degrade the APOBEC proteins and allow the virus to spread. Albin and colleagues learned where Vif interacts with one antiviral protein, APOBEC3F, and showed how the connection can be interrupted by a simple chemical change on the surface of APOBEC3F. They also noted that similar interaction sites are found on the same surface in other members of this antiviral protein family.

"This suggests that the interaction between Vif and these antiviral APOBEC proteins could be blocked with a drug that would shield the Vif interaction region," Albin says. "Such an intervention has the potential to allow as many as seven natural antiviral drugs to spring into action and prevent HIV from spreading."

The Harris lab is focuses on understanding every level of the vital interaction between these human cellular proteins and HIV Vif. They envision that future studies will involve a more refined mapping of the physical interactions between Vif and APOBEC3 proteins, investigation of the potential for HIV to resist stabilizing changes in APOBEC3 proteins, and screens for drug-like compounds that help the cellular APOBECs destroy HIV.

John Albin, a student in the Combined MD-PhD Training Program at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and is completing a thesis under the guidance of his advisor, Reuben Harris, through the Microbiology, Immunology & Cancer Biology PhD program. His studies in the Harris lab focus on the potential of APOBEC proteins to impact HIV evolution and pathogenesis.

This latest finding builds on a body of research from Harris's lab about the relationship between HIV and APOBEC proteins. In 2003 and 2004, Harris helped discover that the APOBEC proteins have the ability to counteract HIV infection.

Harris, who won a 2009 challenge grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to explore ways to block HIV and APOBEC3 interaction, has been studying mechanisms of mutation for nearly 20 years, first as a doctoral student at the University of Alberta, then as a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, and for the past seven years as an NIH supported principal investigator at the University of Minnesota. His laboratory focuses on how mutations can be harnessed to destroy pathogens.


'/>"/>

Contact: John Albin
albi0028@umn.edu
612-624-0459
University of Minnesota
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Rice University establishes National Corrosion Center
2. Case Western Reserve University researchers track Chernobyl fallout
3. Case Western Reserve University project ties soil conservation and river management together
4. Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital expand national childrens study to Bristol County
5. NIH selects Case Western Reserve University to participate in National Childrens Study
6. US Senate confirms Clemson University engineering Dean Esin Gulari to National Science Board
7. University professor stresses links between US Navy sonar and whale strandings
8. Scent on demand: Hebrew University scientists enhance the scent of flowers
9. University success at national engineering awards
10. University of Leicester professor adds new perspective to rainforest debate
11. Providing toilets, safe water is top route to reducing world poverty: UN University
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 ... Biometrics), Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video ... and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by ... in 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 ... 2017 and 2022. The base year considered for the ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... , March 24, 2017 The Controller General ... Controller Mr. Abdulla Algeen have received the prestigious international IAIR ... Continue Reading ... ... picture) and Deputy Controller Abdulla Algeen (small picture on the right) have ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing ... Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected ... 29.63% between 2017 and 2022. Continue Reading ... ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... of Sciences today announced the three Winners and six Finalists of the 2017 ... given annually by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and administered by the New York ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... first-ever genomics analysis platform specifically designed for life science researchers to analyze ... pioneering researcher Rosalind Franklin, who made a major contribution to the discovery ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Proscia Inc ., a data solutions ... “Pathology is going digital. Is your lab ready?” with Dr. Nicolas Cacciabeve, Managing ... how Proscia improves lab economics and realizes an increase in diagnostic confidence.* ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Singh Biotechnology today ... designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3) ... able to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 and inhibit its ...
Breaking Biology Technology: