Navigation Links
Unique winter-hardy hibiscus has roots with AgriLife Research scientist in Vernon
Date:8/14/2009

VERNON He may study grasses by profession, but Texas AgriLife Research forage agronomist Dr. Dariusz Malinowski has a passion for flowers, particularly winter hardy hibiscus.

And it is that passion that has created his latest research project propagating unique winter-hardy hibiscus.

Malinowski said he's very much a grass and forage researcher, but this falls in line with his master's degree in horticulture.

"I like the hardy hibiscus and have been crossing them for four years," he said. "I started getting crosses that were unique in my yard."

A collaboration of Steve Brown, Texas Foundation Seed Service program director, and Malinowski determined commercialization of the flowers would fit in AgriLife Research's effot to work with non-traditional or under-utilized crops that have value because of drought tolerance.

The hardy hibiscus also is a great candidate because it is a carefree plant. It doesn't have to be watered once it gets established, it is low maintenance and has little disease or insect pressure, he said.

To date, Malinowski has produced about 500 crosses. From that number, he has planted about 150 of them around the Vernon area in yards of fellow researchers and at the Texas Foundation Seed facilities.

Only about 25 percent to 30 percent of those have bloomed so far, but 12 have exceptional qualities, Malinowski said.

"The hardy hibiscus found on the market are primarily white, red and pink and are mostly of the same size and shape," he said. "I'm trying to give them diversity, with some spider-type petals, and some new colors, such as lavender, and combinations of colors."

Brown said this research is really another example of how plant- improvement programs at AgriLife Research extend beyond what most think as conventional crops.

The nursery and greenhouse industry in Texas is a $2 billion industry, Brown said.

The green industry has a $13.5 billion financial impact on the state, according to the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association.

"This research touches not only the producers of agricultural products but most homeowners and consumers throughout the state," Brown said. "We'll be working with some of our corporate programs to look at public/private partnerships as we do with other things."

Malinowski said he has gathered many native hibiscus and already-released cultivars, and he is crossing them to accumulate the traits that he prefers in the plants.

He is cross-pollinating the flowers by hand. If successful, a fruit will develop at the bottom of the stem within three days, he said.

"Now it depends on how fast we can propagate them," Malinowski said. A new cultivar can't be propagated from a seed. The new, promising lines must be propagated from cuttings.

"That's the only way we are able to multiply each unique plant that we have now," Malinowski said. "It's not an easy task. We are experimenting with different variables."

He said being able to do tissue cultures in a lab, as the commercial industry does, would be much faster.

Brown said vegetative propogation is the only way to make sure the new plant looks exactly like the selection that the cutting comes from rather than having a segregating population or differing plants, which occurs when seed is planted from a cross between two different plants.

The hibiscus can basically be grown from San Antonio north to Canada, as long as the required winter period is long enough for them to go dormant after the first frost, Malinowski said. The plants resprout from the root the following spring.

Malinowski said he believes the new crosses will be sold as potted plants and can be planted in yards. They will begin to bloom when the night is short, around late June, and continue flowering all season long until a frost.

He also is trying to develop dwarf plants with huge flowers for patios and smaller gardens.

Brown said it could be three years from the time commercially acceptable selections are made before Malinowski's propagations could be available in a nursery or retail outlet.

Timing for the market will require some greenhouse work, Brown said. Cuttings must be taken in the fall or early spring and put into a greenhouse to increase the numbers. In early spring, rooted plants will need to be exposed to extended day-lengths and elevated temperatures to change the timing of the bloom.

"If we get 60 to 100 mother plants, then at that point we would license it to a commercial greenhouse or nursery to expand it from there," he said.

"Then they will do cuttings and greenhouse day-length adjustments and so forth to multiply the variety to the retail strength needed," Brown said.

He said to target the flowering-plant market in retail and garden stores, they will try to get the plants to bloom in early June, rather than July, "because typically consumers want to see a budding plant, not a picture of what they are buying."


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr. Dariusz Malinowski
dmalinow@ag.tamu.edu
940-552-9941
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. A unique arrangement for egg cell division
2. Scientists spy enzyme that makes us unique
3. A unique experiment with chlorine -- and a new way of teaching
4. Unique pattern of gene expression can indicate acetaminophen overdose
5. Starters orders for unique Ph.D.s in sport
6. Unique porous copper structure enables new generation of military micro-detonators
7. Unique fungal collection could hold key to future antibiotics
8. Unique whey protein is promising supplement for strict PKU diet
9. First study hints at insights to come from genes unique to humans
10. Yerkes researchers identify language feature unique to human brain
11. Climate change could severely impact Californias unique native plants
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Unique winter-hardy hibiscus has roots with AgriLife Research scientist in Vernon
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 4, 2017 KEY FINDINGS ... to expand at a CAGR of 25.76% during the ... is the primary factor for the growth of the ... https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4807905/ MARKET INSIGHTS The global stem ... technology, application, and geography. The stem cell market of ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com will ... hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... focus on developing health and wellness apps that provide ... the Genome is the first hackathon for personal ... largest companies in the genomics, tech and health industries ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017  higi, the health IT company that ... North America , today announced a Series B ... of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition accelerates higi,s ... to transform population health activities through the collection and ... higi collects and secures data today on behalf ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... June 19, 2017 , ... ... activities supporting EDETEK’s products including training, implementation, support, and client process and SOP ... role. He has previously held leadership roles for service providers and top-tier pharmaceuticals, ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... ... 16, 2017 , ... Cognition Corporation , a software ... sessions of its “From the Helm” Webinar Series. , The next two ... for design control exercises. Led by David Cronin, Cognition’s CEO, the half-hour public ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... Cybrexa Therapeutics, a start-up ... of financing in the amount of $6 million. An investment vehicle affiliated with ... round. , The Series B funding will enable Cybrexa to complete the build-out ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... ... new guide on how to assemble a lab workstation. The guide outlines the ... include Adam’s Nimbus or Eclipse balance, AVT anti-vibration table, OIML/ASTM certified weights, and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: