Navigation Links
UT Southwestern neuroscience researchers identify gene involved in response to cocaine
Date:12/20/2013

DALLAS Dec. 19, 2013 UT Southwestern neuroscience researchers have identified a gene that controls the response to cocaine by comparing closely related strains of mice often used to study addiction and behavior patterns.

The researchers suspect that the newly identified gene, Cyfip2, determines how mammals respond to cocaine, although it is too soon to tell what the indications are for humans or for addiction, said Dr. Joseph Takahashi, chair of neuroscience and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern and the senior author of the study.

The findings, reported in Science, evolved from examining the genetic differences between two substrains of the standard C57BL/6 mouse strain: a "J" strain from the Jackson Laboratory (C57BL/6J) and an "N" strain from the National Institutes of Health (C57BL/6N). Researchers compared the two strains of mice and used their differential responses to cocaine to identify the causative gene.

"We found that the 'N' strain has accumulated mutations over time, one of which has a very strong effect on cocaine response," Dr. Takahashi said. "We propose that CYFIP2 the protein produced by the Cyfip2 gene is a key regulator of cocaine response in mammals."

The Takahashi laboratory has identified about 100 genetic differences that affect protein sequences between the two mouse strains, meaning that there are many genetic differences whose effects are not yet known, he added.

"We identified this gene by first using a forward genetics strategy to search for differences in traits between the two mouse strains. We found a difference in cocaine response between them, with the C57BL/6N strain showing a reduced behavioral response," Dr. Takahashi said. "We then carried out genetic mapping and whole genome sequencing, which allowed us to pinpoint the Cyfip2 gene as the causative one in a rapid and unambiguous way."

The C57BL/6J "J" mouse is the gold-standard strain for most research involving the mouse. For example, the reference sequence for the mouse genome, as well as most behavioral and physiological experiments, are based on the "J" strain. However, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium will be shifting emphasis to the "N" strain since they have created 17,000 embryonic stem cell lines with gene mutations that originate from the "N" strain. Thus, identifying genetic differences between these two mouse strains is important, Dr. Takahashi said.

"Although mouse geneticists pay close attention to the specific strains of mice that they use, it has not been generally appreciated that sublines of the same strain of mouse might differ so profoundly. Thus, a 'C57BL/6' mouse might appear to be the same, but in fact there are many, many sublines of this laboratory mouse, and it is important to know which exact one you are using. Since the knockout mouse project has produced so many mutations (17,000) derived from the 'N' strain, it will be even more important to keep in mind that not all C57BL/6 mice are the same."


'/>"/>

Contact: Deborah Wormser
deborah.wormser@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Mesquite trees displacing Southwestern grasslands
2. UT Southwestern scientists make mouse model of human cancer, demonstrate cure
3. UT Southwestern researchers identify novel mechanism that helps stomach bug cause illness
4. UT Southwestern researchers identify how body clock affects inflammation
5. UT Southwestern scientist honored as rising star in Texas research
6. Stanford and MIT scientists win Perl-UNC Neuroscience prize
7. 6th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, Vancouver, May 20-23, 2012
8. UCSF pair win Gruber Foundation Neuroscience prize
9. Wiring bats for neuroscience research
10. Media registration opens for Neuroscience 2012, worlds largest brain science meeting
11. Neuroscience: The extraordinary ease of ordinal series
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
UT Southwestern neuroscience researchers identify gene  involved in response to cocaine
(Date:3/29/2016)... March 29, 2016 LegacyXChange, Inc. ... "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to announce our ... in a variety of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures ... created collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured ... the DNA. Bill Bollander , CEO ...
(Date:3/18/2016)... --> --> ... & Unmanned Vehicles, Physical infrastructure and Perimeter Surveillance & Detection ... border security market and the continuing migration crisis in the ... has led visiongain to publish this unique report, ... defence & security companies in the border security ...
(Date:3/14/2016)... http://www.apimages.com ) - ... - Renvoi : image disponible via AP Images ( ... --> DERMALOG, le leader de l,innovation ... d,empreintes digitales pour l,enregistrement des réfugiés en Allemagne. ... produire des cartes d,identité aux réfugiés. DERMALOG dévoilera ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... support for Connecticut's innovative, growing companies, today announced the launch of VentureClash ... technology (fintech) companies. , “VentureClash looks to attract the best early-stage ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... April 28, ... ... plan, QuickSTAT has made significant investments in recruiting top industry experts, and expanding ... IT Platform, which provides industry-leading tools for clients to manage their clinical trial ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Cambridge Semantics, the leading ... today announced that it has been named to The Silicon Review’s “20 Fastest Growing ... other markets, Cambridge Semantics serves the needs of end users facing some of the ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce ... a volunteer member of Committee since 1987. Since then, he has served in a ... and was chairman for both the program and exposition committees. In his professional career, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: