Navigation Links
UT Arlington research may unlock enzyme's role in disease
Date:1/2/2014

A UT Arlington chemist doing National Science Foundation-funded research on enzymes that regulate human biology has uncovered characteristics that could be used to identify predisposition to conditions such as heart disease, diabetic ulcers and some types of cancer.

Brad Pierce, an assistant professor of chemistry/biochemistry at The University of Texas at Arlington, recently led a team that examined an oxygen utilizing iron enzyme called cysteine dioxygenase or CDO, which is found in high levels within heart, liver, and brain tissues. Enzymes are proteins that act as catalysts to enable metabolic functions, but under some circumstances these oxygen-dependent enzymes can also produce highly toxic side products called reactive oxygen species or ROS.

For the first time, Pierce's team found that mutations outside the CDO active site environment or "outer coordination sphere" have a profound influence on the release of ROS. Excess ROS has been linked to numerous age-onset human disease states.

"Most research in the past has focused on the active site inner coordination sphere of these enzymes, where the metal molecule is located," said Pierce. "What we're finding is that it's really the second sphere that regulates the efficiency of the enzyme. In essence, these interactions hold everything together during catalysis. When this process breaks down, the enzyme ends up spitting out high levels of ROS and increasing the likelihood of disease."

The study was published in December by the American Chemical Society journal Biochemistry. Pierce is corresponding author on the paper, with UT Arlington students Wei Li, Michael D. Pecore and Joshua K. Crowell as co-authors. Co-author Elizabeth J. Blaesi is a graduate research assistant at the University of Wisconsin.

Pierce believes the findings from the CDO enzyme could be applied to other oxygen-dependent enzymes, which make up about 20 percent of the enzymes in the human body.

"In principle, these findings could be extended to better understand how other enzymes within the class generate ROS and potentially be used to screen for genetic dispositions for ROS-related diseases," he said.

Pierce's research brings a new level of detail to enzyme study through the use of electron paramagnetic resonance or EPR, a technology similar to the magnetic resonance imaging or MRI used in the medical field. In fall 2012, the National Science Foundation awarded Pierce a three-year, $300,000 grant to study enzymes that are catalysts for the oxidation of sulfur-bearing molecules in the body.

"Dr. Pierce's research is a good example of how basic science can set a path toward discoveries that affect human health. We look forward to his continued exploration of these findings," said Pamela Jansma, dean of the UT Arlington College of Science.


'/>"/>

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. UT Arlingtons Nguyen named American Heart Association fellow
2. NSF awards to UT Arlington researchers will fuel sustainable solutions
3. 9 UT Arlington educators honored for teaching excellence
4. UT Arlington engineer to design prototype that predicts flash flooding
5. UT Arlington research to benefit quality, flow in 150-mile Integrated Pipeline
6. UT Arlington engineer to search for bad algal blooms
7. UT Arlington bioengineer to use hybrid imaging system to see deep tissue
8. UT Arlington engineer wins NSF award to support microfluidic analyses of tissue, cell samples
9. National Academy of Inventors names four UT Arlington professors as charter fellows
10. UT Arlington physics team demonstrates new power generation technique
11. National herpetology society honors UT Arlington professor for discoveries
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
UT Arlington research may unlock enzyme's role in disease
(Date:12/2/2016)... December 1, 2016 The ... Voice), Future Technology (Iris Recognition System), Vehicle Type ... Global Forecast to 2021", published by MarketsandMarkets, the ... in 2016, and is projected to grow to ... of 14.06%.      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160303/792302) ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... CHICAGO , Nov. 30, 2016  higi ... a new partnership initiative targeting national brands, industry ... and reward their respective audiences for taking steps ... Since its inception in 2012, higi has built ... US, impacting over 38 million people who have ...
(Date:11/29/2016)... Nearly one billion matches per second with DERMALOG,s high-speed AFIS    ... ... DERMALOG is Germany's largest Multi-Biometric supplier: The company's Fingerprint ... ... Multi-Biometric supplier: The company's Fingerprint Identification System is part of an efficient ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... Opal ... provide essential device-to-computer interconnect using USB or PCI Express, announced the FOMD-ACV-A4, the ... FOMD-ACV-A4 is a small, thin, SODIMM-style module that fits a standard 204-pin SODIMM ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... 2016  Anaconda BioMed S.L., a pre-clinical stage medical ... generation neuro-thrombectomy system for the treatment of Acute Ischemic ... MD to join its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). The ... of scientific and clinical experts to Anaconda BioMed S.L., ... BRAIN ® to its clinical phase. The SAB ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... Microbial genomics leader, uBiome, joins ... one of just six company finalists in the Health & Medicine category. Over ... nominated as finalists in this year’s awards include Google, SpaceX, Oculus, and SolarCity. ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 Soligenix, Inc. (OTCQB: ... focused on developing and commercializing products to treat rare ... today that it will be hosting an Investor Webcast ... on the origins of innate defense regulators (IDRs) as ... of oral mucositis and the recently announced and published ...
Breaking Biology Technology: