Navigation Links
UIC scientists discover how some bacteria survive antibiotics

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered how some bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment by turning on resistance mechanisms when exposed to the drugs. The findings, published in the April 24 issue of the journal Molecular Cell, could lead to more effective antibiotics to treat a variety of infections.

"When patients are treated with antibiotics some pathogenic microbes can turn on the genes that protect them from the action of the drug," said Alexander Mankin, professor and associate director of the University of Illinois at Chicago's Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and lead investigator of the study. "We studied how bacteria can feel the presence of erythromycin and activate production of the resistance genes."

Erythromycin and newer macrolide antibiotics azithromycin and clarithromycin are often used to treat respiratory tract infections, as well as outbreaks of syphilis, acne and gonorrhea. The drugs can be used by patients allergic to penicillin.

Macrolide antibiotics act upon the ribosomes, the protein-synthesizing factories of the cell. A newly-made protein exits the ribosome through a tunnel that spans the ribosome body. Antibiotics can ward off an infection by attaching to the ribosome and preventing proteins the bacterium needs from moving through the tunnel.

Some bacteria have learned how to sense the presence of the antibiotic in the ribosomal tunnel, and in response, switch on genes that make them resistant to the drug, Mankin said. The phenomenon of inducible antibiotic expression was known decades ago, but the molecular mechanism was unknown.

Mankin and his team of researchers -- Nora Vazquez-Laslop, assistant professor in the Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, and undergraduate student Celine Thum -- used new biochemical and genetic techniques to work out the details of its operation.

"Combining biochemical data with the knowledge of the structure of the ribosome tunnel, we were able to identify some of the key molecular players involved in the induction mechanism," said Vazquez-Laslop.

"We only researched response to erythromycin-like drugs because the majority of the genetics were already known," she said. "There may be other antibiotics and resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria regulated by this same mechanism. This is just the beginning."


Contact: Sam Hostettler
University of Illinois at Chicago

Related biology news :

1. Scientists aim to boost world energy supplies -- with microbes!
2. Scientists determine drug target for the most potent botulinum neurotoxin
3. Scientists make chemical cousin of DNA for use as new nanotechnology building block
4. Scientists find stem cells for the first time in the pituitary
5. Brown scientists say biodiversity is crucial to ecosystem productivity
6. Scientists urged to make a stand on climate change
7. Scientists clarify a mechanism of epigenetic inheritance
8. Scientists to explore global change-public health connection
9. Scientists test device to track medication adherence in patients with HIV/AIDS
10. Scientists discover how nanocluster contaminants increase risk of spreading
11. Smithsonian scientists find evidence that could rewrite Hawaiis botanical history
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/29/2015)... Oct. 29, 2015 Daon, a global leader ... has released a new version of its IdentityX ... North America have already installed IdentityX ... includes a FIDO UAF certified server component ... to activate FIDO features. These customers include some of ...
(Date:10/27/2015)... YORK , Oct. 27, 2015 In ... major issues of concern for various industry verticals such ... is due to the growing demand for secure & ... in various ,sectors, such as hacking of bank accounts, ... for electronic equipment such as PC,s, laptops, and smartphones ...
(Date:10/26/2015)... 2015  Delta ID Inc., a company focused on ... PC devices, announced its ActiveIRIS® technology powers the iris ... launched by NTT DOCOMO, INC in Japan ... smartphone to include iris recognition technology, after a very ... in May 2015, world,s first smartphone to have this ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... , ... December 01, 2015 , ... Matthew “Tex” VerMilyea, ... post, VerMilyea will oversee all IVF lab procedures as well as continue ... preservation. , “We traveled 7,305 miles to Auckland, New Zealand to bring home a ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Global Stem Cells Group ... of a new closed system for isolating adipose-derived stem cells. The announcement starts a ... of adipose tissue. SVF is a component of the lipoaspirate obtained from liposuction of ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Dec. 1, 2015  An interventional radiology technique shows ... the preliminary results of a study being presented today at ... North America (RSNA). --> ... for decades by interventional radiologists as a way to stop ... procedure as a means of treating obesity is new. ...
(Date:11/30/2015)...  Culprits beware, a University at Albany research ... is taking crime scene fingerprint identification to a ... -->   --> Photo ... --> Halámek and his team ... concept for identifying whether a culprit is male ...
Breaking Biology Technology: