Navigation Links
UAB professor's book promises solution for teaching evolution without conflict
Date:9/30/2009

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Associate Professor Lee Meadows, Ph.D., is author of a new book that claims it's possible to teach evolution without offending students who have strong religious convictions against the theory.

In his book, The Missing Link: An Inquiry Approach for Teaching All Students About Evolution, Meadows, a Christian and science educator, writes: "For too long evolution has been denied its place in science curriculum. School policies driven by misunderstanding and fear regularly displace widely recognized principles of science. But without understanding evolution, students no matter what their religious beliefs will never achieve the level of scientific literacy they need to make sense of even everyday practicalities such as how human viruses work."

School districts, politicians and church leaders have debated for decades as to whether Charles Darwin's theory of evolution should be taught in schools. Educators who have taught evolution often have come under attack by students, parents and local religious leaders. As a result, many teachers today have resorted to one of two extremes to avoid arguments over the validity of evolution, says Meadows, who teaches in the UAB School of Education Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

"They either tell students 'check your religion at the door,' or they don't teach evolution at all," Meadows says. "This book attempts to take a middle-of-the road approach."

Rather than trying to convince students of the legitimacy of evolution, Meadows says, teachers should encourage students to examine the scientific evidence for evolution for themselves and guide them in exploring the scientific explanations for that evidence. This can include visits to science Web sites such as the Tree of Life Web Project and reading articles about past and recent scientific discoveries that offer evidence of evolution. Explaining to students the process by which scientists arrive at certain conclusions also should be a part of the science curriculum, Meadows says.

"Children have to understand evolution," he says, "but they don't have to believe it, and that is the key distinction that I have laid out in the book. So if a child asks if God made the whale, it's really an opportunity to talk about natural and supernatural explanations. You are not saying that one is better than the other, only that science is limited to natural explanations."

The book contains overviews of the theory of evolution and inquiry-based science teaching, lesson plans and a list of various Internet resources that educators can use in the classroom.


'/>"/>

Contact: Gail Short
gshort@uab.edu
205-934-8931
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study by NTU professors provides important insight into apoptosis or programmed cell death
2. 2 Alexander von Humboldt professorships go to LMU Munich
3. National Science Foundation grants Clemson professors award to develop nanoprobes
4. LSU professors work to improve efficiency of ethanol fuel
5. New cancer drug test promises safer and more effective clinical trials
6. Breakthrough in radiotherapy promises targeted cancer treatment
7. Two-day symposium in Baltimore to tackle the promises and perils of proton radiotherapy
8. New test promises quicker, more accurate evaluation for cystic fibrosis patients
9. Genetic data promises new future for kiwi fruit
10. Telescope embedded in glasses lens promises to make driving easier for visually impaired
11. Prototype terahertz imager promises biochem advances
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/6/2017)... Forecasts by Product Type (EAC), ... End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government & Public Sector, Utilities ... Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business Organisation (BFSI), ... you looking for a definitive report on the $27.9bn ... ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... NEW YORK , April 4, 2017   ... solutions, today announced that the United States Patent and ... The patent broadly covers the linking of an iris ... the same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... our latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... YORK , March 30, 2017 Trends, ... type (physiological and behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris ... voice recognition, and others), by end use industry (government ... and immigration, financial and banking, and others), and by ... Europe , Asia Pacific , ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Corista, a leader in integrated pathology solutions, ... 25, during the Association of Pathology Chairs’ Jubilee Meeting in Washington, DC. The ... Director of Pathology Informatics, will present “The Digital Pathology Experience at Johns Hopkins.” ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 20, 2017 , ... Corporate Directors Forum is recognizing six San Diego ... the Year Awards. , The awards will be presented Thursday, September 7th, from 6 ... directors who have made significantly positive contributions in the boardrooms of some of our ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... ... July 18, 2017 , ... Nanomedical Diagnostics, a cutting-edge ... the launch of a new NTA biosensor chip for use with its label-free ... kinetics of polyhistidine-tagged (His-tagged) molecules quickly and reliably. , “Recombinant proteins are ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... Switzerland (PRWEB) , ... July 18, 2017 , ... ... R&D, today announced that Merck, a leading science and technology company, has implemented ... innovative therapeutics for the therapeutic areas of Oncology, Immunology, and Neurodegenerative Diseases. , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: