Navigation Links
U of T researchers build an antenna for light
Date:7/10/2011

TORONTO, ON University of Toronto researchers have derived inspiration from the photosynthetic apparatus in plants to engineer a new generation of nanomaterials that control and direct the energy absorbed from light.

Their findings are reported in a forthcoming issue of Nature Nanotechnology, which will be released on July 10, 2011.

The U of T researchers, led by Professors Shana Kelley and Ted Sargent, report the construction of what they term "artificial molecules."

"Nanotechnologists have for many years been captivated by quantum dots particles of semiconductor that can absorb and emit light efficiently, and at custom-chosen wavelengths," explained co-author Kelley, a Professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, the Department of Biochemistry in the Faculty of Medicine, and the Department of Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts & Science. "What the community has lacked until now is a strategy to build higher-order structures, or complexes, out of multiple different types of quantum dots. This discovery fills that gap."

The team combined its expertise in DNA and in semiconductors to invent a generalized strategy to bind certain classes of nanoparticles to one another.

"The credit for this remarkable result actually goes to DNA: its high degree of specificity its willingness to bind only to a complementary sequence enabled us to build rationally-engineered, designer structures out of nanomaterials," said Sargent, a Professor in The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto, who is also the Canada Research Chair in Nanotechnology. "The amazing thing is that our antennas built themselves we coated different classes of nanoparticles with selected sequences of DNA, combined the different families in one beaker, and nature took its course. The result is a beautiful new set of self-assembled materials with exciting properties."

Traditional antennas increase the amount of an electromagnetic wave such as a radio frequency that is absorbed, and then funnel that energy to a circuit. The U of T nanoantennas instead increased the amount of light that is absorbed and funneled it to a single site within their molecule-like complexes. This concept is already used in nature in light harvesting antennas, constituents of leaves that make photosynthesis efficient. "Like the antennas in radios and mobile phones, our complexes captured dispersed energy and concentrated it to a desired location. Like the light harvesting antennas in the leaves of a tree, our complexes do so using wavelengths found in sunlight," explained Sargent.

"Professors Kelley and Sargent have invented a novel class of materials with entirely new properties. Their insight and innovative research demonstrates why the University of Toronto leads in the field of nanotechnology," said Professor Henry Mann, Dean of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy.

"This is a terrific piece of work that demonstrates our growing ability to assemble precise structures, to tailor their properties, and to build in the capability to control these properties using external stimuli," noted Paul S. Weiss, Fred Kavli Chair in NanoSystems Sciences at UCLA and Director of the California NanoSystems Institute.

Kelley explained that the concept published in today's Nature Nanotechnology paper is a broad one that goes beyond light antennas alone.

"What this work shows is that our capacity to manipulate materials at the nanoscale is limited only by human imagination. If semiconductor quantum dots are artificial atoms, then we have rationally synthesized artificial molecules from these versatile building blocks."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jef Ekins
j.ekins@utoronto.ca
416-946-7036
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. NC State researchers get to root of parasite genome
2. Researchers find animal with ability to survive climate change
3. Researchers find an essential gene for forming ears of corn
4. Researchers note differences between people and animals on calorie restriction
5. Researchers study acoustic communication in deep-sea fish
6. Researchers discover that growing up too fast may mean dying young in honey bees
7. Researchers study how pistachios may improve heart health
8. UI researchers find potentially toxic substance present in Chicago air
9. Researchers develop new self-training gene prediction program for fungi
10. Case Western Reserve University researchers track Chernobyl fallout
11. Childrens National researchers develop novel anti-tumor vaccine
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/17/2016)... -- ABI Research, the leader in transformative technology ... will reach more than $30 billion by 2021, ... electronics, particularly smartphones, continue to boost the biometrics ... two billion shipments by 2021 at a 40% ... Analyst at ABI Research. "Surveillance is also gearing ...
(Date:3/15/2016)... , March 15, 2016 Yissum Research ... the technology-transfer company of the Hebrew University, announced today ... remote sensing technology of various human biological indicators. Neteera ... $2.0 million from private investors. ... on the detection of electromagnetic emissions from sweat ducts, ...
(Date:3/14/2016)... 2016 http://www.apimages.com ) - ... - Renvoi : image disponible via AP Images ... --> DERMALOG, le leader de ... lecteurs d,empreintes digitales pour l,enregistrement des réfugiés en ... pour produire des cartes d,identité aux réfugiés. DERMALOG ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/19/2016)... There is no saying when ... relentless pressures in pricing and lack in consumer confidence. ... though - numerous opportunities are up for grabs but ... presents four names in this sector: Portola Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... VTAE ), Anthera Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ...
(Date:5/18/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Shimadzu Scientific Instruments announces its sponsorship of ... two-day camp will take place annually starting June 2016. It will provide qualifying ... preparation for a university academic program. , The laboratory- and technology-focused camp ...
(Date:5/18/2016)... Kansas (PRWEB) , ... May 18, 2016 , ... Ryan ... given a life expectancy in the late teens to early twenties. DMD is a ... In 2009, at the age of 22, Benton’s condition was critical. He met with ...
(Date:5/17/2016)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... May 17, 2016 , ... ... Awareness Month, buildings, bridges, and monuments across the globe will show their support in ... of NF. , Neurofibromatosis, NF, is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: