Navigation Links
U-M researchers find potential new way to fight sepsis
Date:6/10/2011

ANN ARBOR, Mich. By digging a little deeper, researchers may have found a potential target for reversing the deadly blood infection sepsis.

Scientists at the University of Michigan Health System looked at microRNA, a type of RNA that does not code for a protein itself but that can regulate the expression of other genes and proteins. They found that by attacking the right microRNA they could influence a key trigger of inflammatory diseases such as sepsis.

Traditionally, researchers have gone after a bigger target, attempting to find compounds that directly control inflammatory triggers such as interleukin 6, or IL-6.

"If you can connect all the dots, you can target a single microRNA and impact an inflammatory process like sepsis. But given the role of IL-6 in other diseases, we think this might have broader implications than sepsis for diseases where IL-6 plays a role," says study author Pavan Reddy, M.D., associate professor of hematology/oncology at the U-M Medical School.

Results of the study appear in the June 9 issue of Blood.

The researchers looked specifically at dendritic cells, specialized types of cells that are considered the first-responders in an immune response. Dendritic cells are also amongst the most important cells that turn on other immune cells. Using bioinformatics tools, the researchers identified two microRNAs within the dendritic cells that seemed most predominant in regulating IL-6. One, called miR-142-3p, was shown to have a direct link to regulating IL-6, and only IL-6.

The researchers were then able to specifically target miR-142-3p that would block it from influencing IL-6. They found in mice that doing this reduced deaths from sepsis.

"We showed that microRNAs have unique expression profiles in dendritic cells and that miR-142-3p has an important role in dendritic cell response. This suggests targeting microRNAs may be a novel strategy for treating sepsis," says lead study author Yaping Sun, M.D., Ph.D., internal medicine research investigator at the U-M Medical School.

The researchers believe this approach will also hold potential for other inflammatory diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and graft-vs.-host disease, a frequent complication of bone marrow transplant. More research is needed before any treatments become available to patients.


'/>"/>

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Penn researchers show new evidence of genetic arms race against malaria
2. Penn researchers develop biological circuit components, new microscope technique for measuring them
3. Researchers discover potential cause of chronic painful skin
4. University of Iowa researchers identify caffeine-consuming bacterium
5. USC researchers discover genetic mutation causing excessive hair growth
6. Eating dirt can be good for the belly, researchers find
7. Caltech researchers build largest biochemical circuit out of small synthetic DNA molecules
8. UNH researchers receive grant for pioneering carbon cycle model
9. Penn researchers help nanoscale engineers choose self-assembling proteins
10. Researchers from the Viikki Biocenter discover how plants control the formation of wood cells
11. Researchers solve mammoth evolutionary puzzle: The woollies werent picky, happy to interbreed
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
U-M researchers find potential new way to fight sepsis
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic ... by adopting ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, ... accuracy for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of ... ... A research team led by Dr ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... -- higi, the health IT company that operates the largest ... , today announced a Series B investment from BlueCross ... new investment and acquisition accelerates higi,s strategy to create ... health activities through the collection and workflow integration of ... and secures data today on behalf of over 36 ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... ROCKVILLE CENTRE, N.Y. , March 27, 2017 ... by Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) ... Analytics Outpatient EMR Adoption Model sm . In ... top 12% of U.S. hospitals using an electronic ... recognized CHS for its high level of EMR ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... NetDimensions has been ranked ... Research Globe™ for Corporate Learning, 2017. , Aragon Research defines Leaders as organizations ... effectively perform against those strategies. NetDimensions’ ranking as a Leader due to its ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Bacterial biofilms, surface adherent communities of bacteria that are encased ... food poisoning and catheter infections to gum disease and the rejection of medical implants. ... dollars per year, there is currently a paucity of means for preventing their formation ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... , ... May 22, 2017 , ... ... that it is exhibiting in booth B2 at the Association for Pathology ... 22-25. , In addition to demonstrating its Cancer Diagnostic Cockpit and Consultation ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... May 18, 2017 , ... ... the procedure on April 28, 2017 at the Prince Of Wales Private Hospital. ... cervical disc at level C6-C7. The patient failed conservative treatments prior to undergoing ...
Breaking Biology Technology: