Navigation Links
Tumor-attacking virus strikes with 'one-two punch'
Date:12/1/2009

COLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State University cancer researchers have developed a tumor-attacking virus that both kills brain-tumor cells and blocks the growth of new tumor blood vessels.

Their research shows that viruses designed to kill cancer cells oncolytic viruses might be more effective against aggressive brain tumors if they also carry a gene for a protein that inhibits blood-vessel growth.

The protein, called vasculostatin, is normally produced in the brain. In this study, an oncolytic virus containing the gene for this protein in some cases eliminated human glioblastoma tumors growing in animals and significantly slowed tumor recurrence in others. Glioblastomas, which characteristically have a high number of blood vessels, are the most common and devastating form of human brain cancer. People diagnosed with these tumors survive less than 15 months on average after diagnosis.

"This is the first study to report the effects of vasculostatin delivery into established tumors, and it supports further development of this novel virus as a possible cancer treatment," says study leader Balveen Kaur, associate professor of neurological surgery and a researcher with the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. "Our findings suggest that this oncolytic virus is a safe and promising strategy to pursue for the treatment of human brain tumors.

"This study shows the potential of combining an oncolytic virus with a natural blood-vessel growth inhibitor such as vasculostatin. Future studies will reveal the potential for safety and efficacy when used in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy," she says.

The findings were recently published online in the journal Molecular Therapy.

Jayson Hardcastle, a graduate student in Dr. Kaur's laboratory, injected the cancer-killing virus, called RAMBO (for Rapid Antiangiogenesis Mediated By Oncolytic virus), directly into human glioblastoma tumors growing either under the skin or in the brains of mice.

Of six animals with tumors under the skin, those treated with RAMBO survived an average of 54 days. In addition, three of the RAMBO mice were tumor-free at the end of the experiment. Control animals treated with a similar virus that lacked the vasculostatin gene, on the other hand, survived an average of 26 days and none were tumor-free.

Of the animals with a human glioblastoma in the brain, five were treated with RAMBO and lived an average of 54 days. One animal remained tumor-free for more than 120 days. Control animals, by comparison, lived an average of 26 days with no long-term survivors.

In another experiment, the investigators followed the course of tumor changes in animals with tumors in the brain. After an initial period of tumor shrinkage, the remaining cancer cells began regrowing around day 13 in animals given the virus that lacked the blood-vessel inhibitor. In animals treated with RAMBO, tumor regrowth didn't begin until about day 39.

"With additional research, this virus could lead to a new therapeutic strategy for combating cancer," Kaur says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Features of replication suggest viruses have common themes, vulnerabilities
2. First all-African GM crop is resistant to maize streak virus
3. Carnegie Mellon scientist uses mass spectrometer to weigh virus particle, von Willebrand factor
4. Gamma globulin effective in treating eye infections caused by adenoviruses
5. Discovery may help defang viruses
6. Who will recover spontaneously from hepatitis C virus infection
7. Prions and retroviruses -- an unholy alliance?
8. Scientists learn structure of enzyme in unusual virus
9. UGA Odum School of Ecology professor receives grant to study West Nile Virus in NYC
10. New field-deployable biosensor detects avian influenza virus in minutes instead of days
11. Depression, aging, and proteins made by a virus may all play role in heart disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2016)... March 29, 2016 LegacyXChange, Inc. ... "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to announce our ... in a variety of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures ... created collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured ... the DNA. Bill Bollander , CEO ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... 2016 According to ... for Consumer Industry by Type (Image, Motion, Pressure, ... & IT, Entertainment, Home Appliances, & Wearable ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market for ... USD 26.76 Billion by 2022, at a ...
(Date:3/21/2016)... Massachusetts , March 22, 2016 ... facial recognition with passcodes for superior security   ... ), a leading provider of secure digital communications services, ... their biometric technology and offer enterprise customers, particularly those ... secure facial recognition and voice authentication within a mobile ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... -- At present, the Biotech sphere is in ... that volatility is what makes this industry interesting to consider. ... Corp. (NASDAQ: SNTA ), CTI BioPharma Corp. (NASDAQ: ... ), and Heat Biologics Inc. (NASDAQ: HTBX ). ... for these stocks at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/ ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... After several promising treatments in Panama using ... of Knowledge in Panama, a 6 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient received his ... following FDA approval of a second application for a single patient, investigational new ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... The Ankle Plating ... options designed to address fractures of the distal tibia and fibula. This system ... Ankle Plating System 3 is composed of seven plate families that span the ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... ... Lady had been battling arthritis since the age of two and at the ... Hannah sought the help of Dr Jeff Christiansen of Superior Veterinary Surgical Solutions ... help with the pain of Lady’s arthritis. Dr Christiansen suggested that in conjunction with ...
Breaking Biology Technology: