Navigation Links
Trapping T-rays for better security scanners
Date:7/11/2013

Medical diagnostic and security scanners with higher sensitivity could result from University of Adelaide research into detecting T-rays (terahertz waves).

Published in the journal Advanced Optical Materials, the researchers describe a novel structure which traps terahertz waves in tiny (micro-scale) holes to produce much higher contrast imaging than currently possible.

Terahertz waves, which are electromagnetic waves with frequencies between those used for mobile phone communications and for optical fibre communications, are used for some airport body scanners and other security scanners to see through packages and clothes. They are also capable of distinguishing malignant from healthy tissues for cancer detection.

"This work takes an unconventional path to detecting terahertz waves," says Dr Withawat Withayachumnankul, project leader and ARC Postdoctoral Fellow in the University's School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Dr Withayachumnankul has worked with RMIT University in Melbourne and Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg in Germany to produce the new structure using metamaterials (materials that show non-natural properties with the use of carefully engineered structures).

The structure is made of tiny (micro-scale) cavities etched into the surface of silicon. Terahertz waves that hit the structure are captured and compressed inside the cavities.

"By tailoring the silicon properties through the use of micro-structures (the size of a cross-section of human hair) it is possible to trap and confine the waves in a volume much smaller than the wavelength of the terahertz waves," says Dr Withayachumnankul.

"This significantly improves the efficiency of terahertz devices such as scanners and will have broad impact on biomedicine and homeland security, where better contrast means more accurate identification."

RMIT team leader Dr Sharath Sriram says: "We needed to carefully select appropriate materials and processes to produce this device. We couldn't construct the micro-cavities in our first choice of material so we changed to silicon which we had to adapt to make it slightly electrically conductive. We then used established silicon microfabrication techniques to create the micro-cavities, exploiting the conductive properties."

The new structure could be added to conventional terahertz imaging devices to enhance their performance.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr. Withawat Withayachumnankul
withawat@eleceng.adelaide.edu.au
61-402-946-480
University of Adelaide
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. ARS scientists test improved stink bug trapping methods
2. New methods for better purification of wastewater
3. Breakthroughs in Chikungunya research from A*STAR spell new hope for better treatment and protection
4. UNH researchers find African farmers need better climate change data to improve farming practices
5. Giant squids giant eyes: The better to see hungry whales with
6. Improved loblolly pines better for the environment, study finds
7. Fish larvae find the reef by orienting: The earlier the better
8. Intensive kidney dialysis indicates better survival rates than conventional dialysis
9. Modern hybrid corn makes better use of nitrogen, study shows
10. Bigger gorillas better at attracting mates and raising young
11. Better housing conditions for zebrafish could improve research results
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/15/2016)... -- A new partnership announced today will help life ... a fraction of the time it takes today, ... insurance policies to consumers without requiring inconvenient and ... rapid testing (A1C, Cotinine and HIV) and higi,s ... pulse, BMI, and activity data) available at local ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... , April 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid ... setting a new clinical standard in telehealth thanks to ... leveraging the higi platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track ... and body mass index, and, when they opt in, ... convenient visit to a local retail location at no ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... Florida , March 29, 2016 ... the "Company") LegacyXChange "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased ... in ink used in a variety of writing instruments, ... Buyers of originally created collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange ... forensic analysis of the DNA. Bill ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 25, 2016 , ... Scientists at ... line options being tried for mesothelioma may be hampering the research that could lead ... research. Click here to read it now. , The team evaluated 98 ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... ... Lady had been battling arthritis since the age of two and at ... owner Hannah sought the help of Dr Jeff Christiansen of Superior Veterinary Surgical ... and help with the pain of Lady’s arthritis. Dr Christiansen suggested that in conjunction ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cell therapies for a range of serious ... at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) that yielded a newly patented method of converting ... novel method, developed by WPI faculty members Raymond Page, PhD, professor of practice ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... Last ... planning for corporate executives and entrepreneurs, held The Future of San Diego Life Science ... the San Diego life science community attended the event with speakers Dr. Rich Heyman, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: