Navigation Links
Transforming cancer treatment
Date:7/11/2012

A Harvard researcher studying the evolution of drug resistance in cancer is predicting that, in a few decades, "many, many cancers could be manageable."

Martin Nowak, a Harvard Professor of Mathematics and of Biology and Director of the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, is one of several co-authors of a paper, published in Nature, that details how resistance to targeted drug therapy emerges in colorectal cancers, and suggests a new, multi-drug approach to treatment could make many cancers manageable, if not curable, illnesses.

The key, Nowak's research suggests, is to change the way clinicians battle the disease.

Though physicians and researchers in recent years have increasingly turned to "targeted therapies" new drugs which combat cancer by interrupting its ability to grow and spread rather than traditional chemotherapy, the treatment is far from perfect. Most are only effective for a few months before the cancer evolves resistance to the drugs and is able to grow unchecked.

In the particular colon cancer treatment that was the subject of Nowak's research, the culprit is the KRAS gene. Normally responsible for producing a protein to regulate cell division, when activated, the gene helps cancer cells develop resistance to targeted therapy drugs, effectively making the treatment useless.

Based on analysis completed by Benjamin Allen, a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Mathematical Biology, and Ivana Bozic, a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Mathematics, Nowak's research suggests that, of the billions of cancer cells that exist in a patient, only a tiny percentage about one in a million are resistant to drugs used in targeted therapy. When treatment starts, the non-resistant cells are wiped out. The few resistant cells, however, quickly repopulate the cancer, causing the treatment to fail.

The answer, Nowak argued, is simple rather than the one drug used in targeted therapy, treatments must involve at least two drugs.

Nowak isn't new to such suggestions in 1995, he participated in a study, also published in Nature, that focused on the rapid evolution of drug resistance in HIV. The end result of that study, he said, was the development of the drug "cocktail" many HIV-positive patients use to help manage the disease.

Ultimately, Nowak estimated that hundreds of drugs might be needed to address all the possible treatment variations. The challenge in the near term, he said, is to develop those drugs. Once available, though, he believes the multi-drug approach offers a new avenue for cancer treatment, one that may fundamentally alter how the public views the disease.

"This will be the main avenue for research into cancer treatment, I think, for the next decade and beyond," Nowak said. "As more and more drugs are developed for targeted therapy, I think we will see a revolution in the treatment of cancer."


'/>"/>

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Preclinical studies use specialized ultrasound to detect presence of cancer
2. Cancer Cell article shows first evidence for targeting of Pol I as new approach to cancer therapy
3. Researchers discover molecule in immune system that could help treat dangerous skin cancer
4. Stanford scientists find molecule to starve lung cancer and improve ventilator recovery
5. Tumor microenvironment helps skin cancer cells resist drug treatment
6. Cancer scientists link ‘oncometabolite’ to onset of acute myeloid leukemia
7. The genomics symposium to boost the further development of cancer research
8. Study identifies pathway to enhance usefulness of EGFR inhibitors in lung cancer treatment
9. Regulation of telomerase in stem cells and cancer cells
10. 5th Latin American Conference on Lung Cancer
11. Husband-wife team set out to improve breast cancer exams
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. , April 11, ... biometric identity management and secure authentication solutions, today ... million contract by Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity ... technologies for IARPA,s Thor program. "Innovation ... the onset and IARPA,s Thor program will allow ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... SEATTLE , April 5, 2017  The Allen ... the Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic ... large-scale 3D imaging data, the first application of deep ... edited human stem cell lines and a growing suite ... the platform for these and future publicly available resources ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, ... Hack the Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters ... two-day competition will focus on developing health and wellness ... Hack the Genome is the first ... tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... September 22, 2017 , ... The ... Denver, Colorado October 28 and 29, 2017, to promote AMA’s programs, member services, ... participation in different hobbies, including but not limited to model aviation and other ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... Vixiar Medical ... engineering and manufacturing functions to The LaunchPort™ Accelerator at the City Garage in ... range of manufacturing and business services to its Residents. , Vixiar Medical ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... (PRWEB) September 21, 2017 , ... The 3rd World Congress ... the latest knowledge on these products, which are increasingly used in crop production ... of Biostimulants on Plant Nutrition, Abiotic Stresses, Plant Growth and Development, as well ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... company, who enable the world’s most progressive pharma and biotech organizations to do ... at top pharma and biotech events in Q4. , DrugDev will demonstrate DrugDev ...
Breaking Biology Technology: