Navigation Links
Toothsome research: Deducing the diet of a prehistoric hominid
Date:2/11/2009

In an unusual intersection of materials science and anthropology, researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and The George Washington University (GWU) have applied materials-science-based mathematical models to help shed light on the dietary habits of some of mankinds prehistoric relatives. Their work forms part of a newly published, multidisciplinary analysis* of the early hominid Australopithecus africanus by anthropologists at the State University of New York at Albany and elsewhere.

In the new study, Albany researcher David Strait and his colleagues** applied finite element analysisan engineers modeling tool that employs an intricate geometric mesh to calculate the stresses and strains at play in complex shapesto the teeth and jaws of A. africanus, an African hominid that lived 2 to 3 million years ago. Their goal was to determine just how, and with how much force, the animal chomped and chewed its food. Such analyses are of great importance to anthropologists. Teeth are the hardest parts of the body, and so are the parts most likely to be found after millions of years. Careful examination of subtle features of teeth and jaws can reveal what an animal could eat, which implies what it did eat, which implies a host of things about its environment, habits and survival strategies.

A. africanus presented a puzzle. Classical analysis of the skulllarge molars and premolars with thick enamel, thick heavy jawbones, strong chewing muscles as evidenced by their anchor points on the bonepointed to a diet of small, hard seeds. The finite-element analysis threw a spanner in the works. It suggested that A. africanuss facial and jaw anatomy was optimized to handle stress on the premolars, teeth located farther forward in the mouth and most useful for chewing larger hard objects. But recent studies had shown that the teeth lacked the microscopic wear patterns characteristic of chewing hard objects, a contradiction.

Here, work by NIST researcher Brian Lawn and a group at GWU headed by Peter Lucas came in handy. Driven by an interest in tooth restoration materials, they had been studying teeth using fracture mechanics, a field that considers how materials fail under excessive loads. Our analytical approach produces equations that predict how each mode of damage will occur under different conditions and this enables us to determine trends for different tooth sizes, different food sizes, different food hardness and so on, explained Lawn. What they show is that, under some conditions, teeth will actually fracture before they wear. This explained the absence of microwear patterns in the teeth, which would normally not be used for chewing small hard seeds. A lot of people have thought the most important part of the survival of the tooth is wear, but its now becoming evident that the fracture properties are also very important because theres a limit to the force that you can apply. Wear is important, but when you start to bite on harder, larger objects, fracture becomes more important, Lawn said.

This is a neat example of how really basic materials sciencefracture mechanicshas important implications for biological sciences and anthropology, Strait observed. In the bigger picture, said Strait, the new understanding about A. africanuss diet may help to explain its successful adaptation to changing climates. A large hard nut that had to be cracked with the premolars may not have been a preferred meal, but it could be something to fall back on when other foods were scarce.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Paradigm shift in Alzheimerss research: new treatments
2. New research: Fruit juice consumption not related to overweight in children
3. Advances in the field of schizophrenia research: New genetic factors identified
4. Robotics research: Enhancing the lives of people with disabilities
5. Geisinger research: Antimalarial drug prevents diabetes in arthritis patients
6. K-State research: Freshwater pollution costs US at least $4.3 billion a year
7. Prehistoric aesthetics explains snail biogeography puzzle
8. Getting warmer? Prehistoric climate can help forecast future changes
9. Male dinosaurs may have been prehistoric babysitters, study shows
10. At 2,500 pounds and 43 feet, prehistoric snake is the largest on record
11. Largest prehistoric snake on record discovered in Colombia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Toothsome research: Deducing the diet of a prehistoric hominid
(Date:12/15/2016)... Germany , December 15, 2016 ... announced an agreement with NuData Security, an award-winning ... partnership will enable clients to focus on good customer experience, ... protection regulation. ... In order to provide a one-stop fraud prevention suite, ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... LONDON , Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... the driving experience, health wellness and wellbeing ... As one in three new passenger vehicles ... voice recognition, gesture recognition, heart beat monitoring, ... eyelid monitoring, facial monitoring, and pulse detection. ...
(Date:12/12/2016)... , Dec. 12, 2016  Researchers at ... possibilities for graphene by combining the material with ... highly sensitive pressure detector able to sense pulse, ... a small spider.  The research ... can be read here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... PLAINVIEW, N.Y. , Jan. 18, 2017 ... pathology services, announces the formation of an Executive Committee ... 2017 and beyond. John Cucci , ... been promoted from Director of Business Development to ... in 2015, Mr. Cucci served in senior sales leadership ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... According to a new market research report "In situ Hybridization Market ... User (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratories, Academic and Research Institutions) - Global Forecast to 2021" ... 2021 from USD 557.1 Million in 2016, growing at a CAGR of 5.8%. ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... HACKENSACK, N.J. , Jan. 18, 2017   ... leading the fight to end Duchenne muscular dystrophy ... awarded to the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) ... ongoing exploration of robotic technology to assist ... study to incorporate NJIT,s technology – an embedded computer, ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... to more and more E&L expertise. Within Albany Molecular Research, Inc. (AMRI), the ... in the past year and is planned for further growth in 2017. Extractable ...
Breaking Biology Technology: