Navigation Links
Too hot to handle! Scientists identify heat sensing regulator
Date:5/13/2008

Neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins are a step closer to understanding pain sensitivity - specifically why its variable instead of constant - having identified a gene that regulates a heat-activated molecular sensor.

Their description of the function of a membrane protein called Pirt appears in the May 2 issue of Cell.

Pain sensitivity increases during inflammation or injury and we want to know what molecules are involved in pain sensation when sensitivity is elevated, says Xinzhong Dong, Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuroscience at Hopkins.

The ability to sense temperature heat and spice is controlled by the TRPV1 protein channel found on the surface of certain nerve cells. In an inactive state, TRPV1 channels remain closed-there is no pain sensation. However, when noxious heat-temperatures above 108 degrees Fahrenheit-or capsaicin-the main ingredient in hot peppers-activates a TRPV1 channel, ions flow through, depolarizing the nerve to create an electrical current that sends pain signals to the brain.

The interesting thing about this channel is its not always constant, says Dong, whose team set out to find proteins that modulate TRPV1s action. They found the Pirt protein,phosphoinositide interacting regulator of TRP, and named it for its ability to regulate the TRPV1 channel.

To better understand how Pirt works, the researchers made mice that lacked Pirt and tested their ability to respond to heat. The mice were placed on a hot surface and monitored for how long it took them to scurry off. Mice lacking Pirt responded significantly slower than normal mice.

The team then exposed one hind paw to capsaicin and found that mice lacking Pirt did not lick their paws as long as normal mice, suggesting that without Pirt, they were compromised in their ability to sense the spice of capsaicin. The researchers also tried mustard oil on the hind paw and found mice lacking Pirt licked for about the same amount of time as normal mice. These observations suggest that Pirts action is specific to capsaicin and not other chemicals.

To figure out whether Pirt directly affects TRPV1 channel action, the researchers measured electrical currents generated by TRPV1 in single nerve cells with or without Pirt. They exposed some nerves to noxious heat-108 degrees Fahrenheit-and some nerves to capsaicin and compared currents generated in each cell. Cells containing Pirt generated stronger currents in heat and spice than cells lacking Pirt, leading the researchers to conclude that Pirt is required for a full pain response to both heat and spice.

Further research revealed that Pirt interacts with yet another molecule in the cell, a so-called acidic phospholipid, allowing access to TRPV1. According to Dong, through this phospholipid Pirt somehow changes the TRP channel, perhaps by opening it wider, or maybe by causing it to stay open longer. And the result is elevated pain sensitivity.

Exactly how Pirt regulates the TRPV1 channel isnt yet clear, says Dong. The goal is to find molecules that specifically affect the pain pathway, but not other nerves, he says. Were looking for genes specifically turned on in pain-sensing neurons. If we find them and can target them with new drugs, we will be able to treat pain without unfavorable side effects.


'/>"/>

Contact: Audrey Huang
audrey@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists dig deeper into the genetics of schizophrenia by evaluating microRNAs
2. Scientists endure Arctic for last campaign prior to CryoSat-2 launch
3. Scientists discover why plague is so lethal
4. UF scientists discover compound that could lead to new blood pressure drugs
5. UIC scientists discover how some bacteria survive antibiotics
6. Scientists aim to boost world energy supplies -- with microbes!
7. Scientists determine drug target for the most potent botulinum neurotoxin
8. Scientists make chemical cousin of DNA for use as new nanotechnology building block
9. Scientists find stem cells for the first time in the pituitary
10. Brown scientists say biodiversity is crucial to ecosystem productivity
11. Scientists urged to make a stand on climate change
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, a ... authentication solutions, today announced that it has been ... Research Projects Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation Presentation ... "Innovation has been a driving force ... program will allow us to innovate and develop ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... 2017 Forecasts by Product Type ... by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government & Public Sector, ... Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business Organisation ... Are you looking for a definitive report on the ... ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... --  EyeLock LLC , a leader of iris-based identity ... and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent No. ... iris image with a face image acquired in sequence ... th issued patent. "The issuance ... multi-modal biometric capabilities that have recently come to market ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... Kathy Goin is joining ... She brings years of expertise in establishing and leading clinical operations at Sponsors ... licensed occupational therapist, through a variety of leadership roles in Clinical Operations, to ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... , ... May 22, 2017 , ... ... with other leaders of the Maryland Biohealth community in developing and issuing recommendations ... Top 3 U.S. BioHealth Innovation Hub by 2023. , The ...
(Date:5/19/2017)... ... May 19, 2017 , ... The University City Science Center ... ripe for commercialization, and who are affiliated with the 21 partner academic and ... QED, now in its tenth round, is the first multi-institutional proof-of-concept program for ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... 17, 2017 , ... DAACRO ... power by providing investigators access to a high-profile scientific advisory board. Today, ... advisory board. “We are committed to offering superior services and solutions for ...
Breaking Biology Technology: