Navigation Links
Tomato pathogen genome may offer clues about bacterial evolution
Date:4/14/2008

Blacksburg, Va.. The availability of new genome sequencing technology has prompted a Virginia Tech plant scientist to test an intriguing hypothesis about how agricultures early beginnings may have impacted the evolution of plant pathogens.

Boris Vinatzer, assistant professor of plant pathology, physiology, and weed science in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, has received a $1 million, five-year Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to investigate the pathogen that causes bacterial speck disease of tomatoes and to develop a new undergraduate course in microbial genomics.

Little is known about how plant pathogens, which were adapted to natural mixed-plant communities in pre-agriculture times, evolved into todays highly aggressive pathogens of crops cultivated in monoculture, Vinatzer said. To fill this void, this project aims at identifying the molecular evolutionary mechanisms that allow pathogens to specialize to specific plant species and to become more aggressive.

In 2007, Vinatzer sequenced the genome of a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain using technology from the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI) at Virginia Tech and funding from the universitys Institute for Biomedical and Public Health Sciences. The tomato pathogen was the first genome to be sequenced on the new Roche GS-FLX machine, which VBI had just purchased with Virginias Commonwealth Research Initiative funding.

That sequence, in addition to other preliminary data, allowed me to develop a hypothesis on the evolution of plant pathogenic bacteria since the beginning of agriculture, Vinatzer said. The hypothesis is that plant pathogenic bacteria evolved from relatively weak pathogens that caused disease in many plants to specialized highly virulent pathogens of single crops after entire fields of the same plant species became available to them in agricultural fields. Importantly, understanding the mechanisms pathogens used to adapt to crops in the past will help us predict how they might change again in the future and allow us to breed or engineer crops for long-lasting disease resistance.

Vinatzers approach combines comparative evolutionary genomics, population genetics, and microbial genetics and leverages the latest advances in the biological sciences and the computer sciences. He is collaborating with Joo Setubal, associate professor and deputy director at VBI.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael Sutphin
msutphin@vt.edu
540-231-6975
Virginia Tech
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Tomato pathogen genome may offer clues about bacterial evolution at dawn of agriculture
2. Understanding, combating foodborne pathogens E. coli 0157 and salmonella
3. New magnetic separation technique might detect multiple pathogens at once
4. New system would use rotating magnetic field to detect pathogens
5. K-State specialist in tick-borne pathogens receives $1.8 million grant
6. Pathogens use previously undescribed mechanism to sabotage host immune system
7. Can interacting pathogens explain disease patterns?
8. Breakthrough research turns the tide on water-borne pathogen
9. Technology uses live cells to detect food-borne pathogens, toxins
10. Researcher discovers pathway plants use to fight back against pathogens
11. Unravelling new complexity in the genome
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)... 2017 Today HYPR Corp. , leading ... component of the HYPR platform is officially FIDO® ... security architecture that empowers biometric authentication across Fortune 500 ... secured over 15 million users across the financial services ... home product suites and physical access represent a growing ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com will host the world,s ... at Microsoft,s headquarters in Redmond, Washington ... health and wellness apps that provide a unique, personalized ... is the first hackathon for personal genomics and the ... the genomics, tech and health industries are sending teams ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 ... Biometrics), Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video ... and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by ... in 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 ... 2017 and 2022. The base year considered for the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... and related applications were the focus of researchers, engineers, product developers, and industry ... in Anaheim. , Sponsored by SPIE, the international society for optics and ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... to nourishing a range of emerging technology-based businesses, recently earned a $77,518 grant ... location. , Founded in 2004, FITCI is Frederick’s first incubator. A non-profit ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... , April 20, 2017  Eli Lilly and Company ... data evaluating galcanezumab for the prevention of migraine at ... will take place April 22-28, 2017, in ... four abstracts at AAN, including safety and patient outcomes ... associated with a reduction in monthly migraine headache days ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... Hong Kong (PRWEB) , ... April 20, 2017 , ... ... for Global Sales. , With over 20 years of experience in the learning technologies ... LEO, a sister company within Learning Technologies Group plc (LTG). At LEO, Mastin served ...
Breaking Biology Technology: