Navigation Links
Thinking about kids? Man, you gotta shed the kilos
Date:8/22/2012

Australian scientists studying the impact obesity has on pregnancy, are urging men to get 'match fit' before conceiving to assist with fetal development.

Reproductive experts from the University of Melbourne's Department of Zoology have discovered that a father's obesity negatively impacts sperm, resulting in smaller fetuses, poor pregnancy success and reduced placental development.

While the health risks surrounding obesity and pregnancy have largely been centred on overweight mothers, scientists from the University of Melbourne are putting the onus on men to shape up.

Word Health Organisation figures showing 75 per cent of Australian adult males are overweight or obese, greatly exceeding the global average rate of 48 per cent.

The findings will be presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Endocrine Society of Australia and the Society for Reproductive Biology 2012, starting from August 26-29 on the Gold Coast.

The research was conducted by Professor David Gardner, Dr Natalie Hannan and PhD student Natalie Binder.

"Australia has a weight problem; the rate of obesity among men of reproductive age has more than tripled in the last three decades," Professor Gardner said.

"A lot of men don't understand what contribution they're having, but they need to be healthy before conceiving. Sperm needs to be match fit for the games of life and creating life is the biggest thing that we can do."

The study used in vitro fertilisation (IVF) on animals to determine the effects of paternal obesity on embryo implantation into the womb and fetal development.

PhD candidate Natalie Binder generated embryos from both normal weight and obese male mice - the latter had been fed the equivalent of a western fast food diet for ten weeks.

"We found that development was delayed in the fetuses produced from obese fathers. The rate of embryo implantation into the womb and fetal development decreased in these animals by up to 15 per cent," she said.

"Furthermore, placental weight and development was significantly less for embryos derived from the sperm of obese males.

"These findings indicate that paternal obesity not only negatively affects embryo development, but also impacts on the successful implantation into the womb.

"This then results in a small placenta which impairs fetal growth and development with long term consequences for the health of the offspring.

"Our study provides more information about the impact of obesity in men, their ability to start a family and the need to shed kilos in preparation to conceive."


'/>"/>
Contact: Rebecca scott
rebeccas@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-440-181
University of Melbourne
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Thinking and choosing in the brain
2. What we know and dont know about Earths missing biodiversity
3. Study reveals good news about the GI of rice
4. Sandy beaches, hydrocarbon reservoirs, tectonic tilting: Its all about geology
5. A new vision for harnessing data about life on Earth
6. NIST launches new website to educate industry about alternatives to mercury thermometers
7. New discoveries about severe malaria
8. Purdue professor to speak before Congress about nanotechnology in brain treatment research
9. Study raises questions about use of anti-epilepsy drugs in newborns
10. Fruit flies provide new knowledge about uninhibited cell growth
11. Analysis raises atmospheric, ecologic and economic doubts about forest bioenergy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016 The ... apparently one of the most popular hubs of ... MetaHIT and other huge studies of human microbiota, ... past few years, the microbiome space has literally ... biomedical research. This report focuses on biomedical ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016  BioMEMS devices ... primarily focused on medical screening and diagnostic ... parameters. Wearable devices that facilitate and assure ... of movement are being bolstered through new ... biomedical signal acquisition coupled with wireless connectivity ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... 2016  Based on its recent analysis of ... US-based Intelligent Retinal Imaging Systems (IRIS) with the ... New Product Innovation. IRIS, a prominent cloud-based retinal ... , is poised to set the new ... market. The IRIS technology presents superior price-performance value ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... The publishing industry has ... publishing is one of the popular publication models that has received wider acknowledgement ... and 3000+ International Conferences across the globe, OMICS International is all ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... 2016 This market research report on the ... prospects of the market in terms of revenue (USD ... in the manufacture of microbiology culture media and related ... market snapshot providing the overall information of various market ... section also provides the overall information and data analysis ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... BOSTON , Feb. 9, 2016 ... a data-driven, biological research approach, has announced the ... Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer. Haddock brings ... corporate finance, including 12 years in senior financial ... global experience in business organizational management. ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Feb. 8, 2016 Should antibiotic bone cement ... products to prevent infection after standard total hip or ... at ECRI Institute have been fielding a lot lately. ... Your Bottom Line?" --> "Antibiotic ... --> While there isn,t a ...
Breaking Biology Technology: