Navigation Links
The sweet growth of plant cells
Date:6/16/2011

Porto Alegre, Brazil- Glycomics is the functional study of the entire set of sugars found in a given species. To some, the term may sound like a distant cousin of more familiar names such as genomics and proteomics. Indeed, while genomics and proteomics of several species have been extensively investigated in the last years, glycomics is still an emerging field. Now, a paper published in Science magazine by an international collaboration headed by Dr. Jose Estevez (University of Buenos Aires, Argentina) and co-authored by researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, the United States and Australia examines in depth the fundamental role that carbohydrates play in the growth of root hairs of Arabidopsis thaliana, a small flowering plant widely used as a model system in plant cell biology and development.

"The structural plasticity of carbohydrates is greater than that of amino acids but our understanding of the implications of such plasticity and how it relates to a potential biological function is still limited. This paper contributes with new insights into the fundamental role that these very dynamic compounds have in Arabidopsis thaliana" says Dr. Hugo Verli, a scientist at the Biotechnology Center of Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil, and co-author of the study.

The cell wall of plants is a very rigid structure comprised largely of sugars and proteins. However, during plant growth these cells increase 200 times their original size by addition of more sugars and proteins. How does the cell wall withstand the driving forces for growth? It has been assumed that chemical changes of wall constituents and wall networks orchestrated by enzymes and cell-wall modifying genes are implicated in the process.

To investigate the issue, the collaboration group worked with the root hairs of Arabidopsis thaliana. Growing root hairs require intensive cell-wall changes to accommodate expansion at the apical end by a process known as tip growth. Apically growing cells, such as those of root hairs, are great models to study the dynamic regulation of growth. Additionally, root hairs play an important role in plant nutrition and water uptake. The authors found that O-glycosylation, a process by which carbohydrates are attached to proteins, lipids and other organic molecules, is crucial for root-hair growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

The study shows that blockage of the O-glycosylation reaction inhibits the growth of root hairs by 50%. Additionally, when the genes expressing the enzymes responsible for the O-glycosylation reaction are missing in the cell, the plants display shorter than normal root-hair length and reduced root-hair density. On the other hand, over-expression of these same enzymes doubles the length and increases the density of root hairs.

The changes that O-glycosylated cell-wall proteins undergo during growth represent a starting point to unravel the entire biochemical pathway involved in plant growth and development. Most important, the acquired ability to modulate growth in Arabidopsis thaliana is a breakthrough that can be further applied to other species in order to increase plant biomass through the vital functions of nutrient and water uptake of plant root hairs.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr. Jose Estevez
jestevez@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar
54-911-356-16135
Publicase Comunicao Cientfica
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. The sweet mysteries of the nervous system
2. Sweet chemistry: Carbohydrate adhesion gives stainless steel implants beneficial new functions
3. New citrus variety released by UC Riverside is very sweet, juicy and low-seeded
4. Genetic changes behind sweet tooth
5. The sweetness of biodegradable plastics
6. Sour research, sweet results
7. Genes from sweet pepper to fortify African banana against devastating wilt disease
8. Hopkins team discovers sweet way to detect prediabetes
9. A bittersweet warning for women with gestational diabetes
10. Kids now see fewer television ads for sweets and beverages, but more for fast food
11. UM School of Medicine scientists find hormone influences sensitivity to sweetness
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... Trends, opportunities and forecast in this market ... (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, hand geometry, vein ... use industry (government and law enforcement, commercial and retail, ... others), and by region ( North America ... Pacific , and the Rest of the World) ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... The report "Video Surveillance Market ... Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), and Service (VSaaS, ... to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market was valued ... to reach USD 75.64 Billion by 2022, at a ... year considered for the study is 2016 and the ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. Mohamed Anwar and ... international IAIR Award for the most innovative high security ePassport and eGates  ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller General, Mr. Mohamed Anwar ... right) have received the IAIR award for the "Most innovative high security ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... the three Winners and six Finalists of the 2017 Blavatnik Regional Awards for ... Blavatnik Family Foundation and administered by the New York Academy of Sciences to ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... AMRI, a ... biotechnology industries to improve patient outcomes and quality of life, will now be ... are being attributed to new regulatory requirements for all new drug products, including ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Personal eye wash is a basic first aid supply for any work environment, ... eye do you rinse first if a dangerous substance enters both eyes? It’s one less ... with its unique dual eye piece. , “Whether its dirt and debris, or an acid ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... the Netherlands and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. ... The Institute of Cancer Research, London ... use MMprofiler™ with SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients ... trial known as MUK nine . The University of ... trial, which is partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR ...
Breaking Biology Technology: