Navigation Links
Texas Tech researcher: Bee colony collapse associated with viral, fungal infection
Date:10/8/2010

The sudden death of bee colonies since late 2006 across North America has stumped scientists. But today, researchers may have a greater understanding of the mysterious colony collapse disorder, said a Texas Tech University biologist.

Shan Bilimoria, a professor and molecular virologist, said the bees may be taking a one-two punch from both an insect virus and a fungus, which may be causing bees to die off by the billions.

Bilimoria is part of a team of researchers searching for the cause of the collapse. Led by research professor Jerry Bromenshenk from the University of Montana in Missoula, the group also includes virologists and chemists from the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center and the Instituto de Ecologica AC in Mexico.

Their study was published this week in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE.

"At this stage, the study is showing an association of death rates of the bees with the virus and fungus present," Bilimoria said. "Our contribution to this study confirms association. But even that doesn't prove cause and effect. Not just yet."

The mysterious colony deaths have caused major concern with scientists since much of agriculture depends on bees to pollinate crops.

To discover what might be attacking bee colonies, the team ground up dead bees that had succumbed to colony collapse disorder. Using analytical equipment, researchers discovered through spectroscopic analysis evidence of a moth virus called insect iridescent virus (IIV) 6 and a fungal parasite called Nosema.

The insect virus is closely related to another virus that wiped out bee populations 20 years ago in India, he said. Also, unlike previous research that found the deaths may be caused by a virus with RNA, the IIV 6 contains DNA.

"Our DNA discovery puts this field in a whole new direction," he said.

Bilimoria said Texas Tech supplied the virus material for the experiments and were tested on bees with the fungus. Though an association between exposure and death was found, scientists don't yet know if the two pathogens cause CCD or whether CCD colonies are more likely to succumb to the two pathogens.

"To prove cause and effect, we will have to isolate the virus and fungus from bee colony, and then reinfect with same virus and fungus," Bilimoria said.

In the next part of the research project, Bilimoria will work to isolate the virus from infected bees.

"Once we isolate and identify the virus, we will have a way of monitoring it," he said. "It is easier to fight the problem if we know what the culprit is."


'/>"/>

Contact: John Davis
john.w.davis@ttu.edu
806-742-2136
Texas Tech University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Improving cotton the goal of $3.8 million grant to University of Texas at Austin plant geneticist
2. Texas A&M chemical engineers work could lead to improved DNA analysis
3. Test-tube calf embryos more likely to survive Texas summers
4. Texas A&M research produces tools to study stallions subfertility
5. A river flipped: Humans trump nature on Texas river
6. Texas petrochemical emissions down, but still underestimated, says study
7. Texas A&M spring graduate contributes to mental retardation research published in Nature
8. Chances of hurricane hitting Texas discussed at UH conference
9. Texas A&M veterinary researchers achieve cloning first
10. Texas Childrens Hospital vaccine experts present 4 studies
11. New bony-skulled dinosaur species discovered in Texas
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/29/2016)... CANNES, France , November 29, 2016 Nearly ... Continue Reading ... ... System is part of an efficient Identity Management. (PRNewsFoto/DERMALOG Identification Systems) ... DERMALOG is Germany's largest Multi-Biometric ...
(Date:11/21/2016)... Nov. 21, 2016   Neurotechnology , a ... technologies, today announced that the MegaMatcher On Card ... submitted for the NIST Minutiae Interoperability Exchange ... the mandatory steps of the evaluation protocol. ... continuing test of fingerprint templates used to establish ...
(Date:11/15/2016)... 2016  Synthetic Biologics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: SYN), ... the gut microbiome, today announced the pricing of ... its common stock and warrants to purchase 50,000,000 ... to the public of $1.00 per share and ... the offering, excluding the proceeds, if any from ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... , ... December 01, 2016 , ... ... long-term client Nanowear on their recent FDA Class II 510(k) clearance for their ... significant hurdle in commercializing remote cardiac monitoring devices that rely on cloth-based nanosensors. ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... bioLytical Laboratories, a world leader in rapid infectious disease tests, introduced the Company,s newest ... members. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161201/444905 ) Continue Reading ... ... , , bioLytical was invited ... introduce the INSTI HIV Self Test to 350 pharmacy representatives in Nairobi ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... Nov. 30, 2016 Biotest Pharmaceuticals Corporation (BPC), ... to announce the addition of its newest plasma collection ... Nebraska . The 15,200 square foot state-of-the-art facility ... 2016 and brings the total number of BPC,s plasma ... Carlisle , BPC,s Chief Executive Officer said "We are ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... November 2016   Merck , ein ... Unterzeichnung einer Reihe von Vereinbarungen mit Evotec ... AG Screeningleistungen für Mercks Palette genetischer Reagenzien ... auf diese Bibliotheken in Kombination mit Evotecs ... Weg zur Ermittlung und Erforschung neuer Arzneimitteltargets.    ...
Breaking Biology Technology: