Navigation Links
Tax on salt could reduce cardiovascular disease deaths by 3 percent
Date:4/21/2012

Voluntary industry reductions in salt content and taxation on products containing salt in 19 developing countries could reduce the number of deaths each year from cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 2-3 per cent in these countries. The preliminary data presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology are the first findings from a new report from Harvard that will be published later this year.

The study set out to assess the cost-effectiveness of two interventions - voluntary salt reduction by industry, and taxation on salt - in 19 developing countries, that represent more than half of the world's population. The required salt reduction levels were modeled on the UK Food Standards Agency experience which set a series of targets for individual food products that have led to a net intake reduction, so far, of 9.5 per cent overall in the country. While a taxation increase of 40 per cent on industry prices (similar to tobacco), determined by previous work to lead to a 6 per cent reduction in consumption, was also evaluated.

The analysis found that both strategies would be save money by reducing the number of people needing treatment for hypertension and CVD events such as myocardial infarction (heart attacks) and stroke. Moreover, the study found that these two strategies could reduce the incidence of myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) by up to about 1.7 per cent and 1.47 per cent in China and India respectively. Reductions would also been seen in the incidence of stroke of 4.7 per cent in China and 4 per cent in India.

"These results show that strategies to reduce sodium consumption, even by modest amounts, could lead to significant reductions in CVD mortality in developing countries and potentially save overall healthcare costs associated with these diseases," said Dr. Thomas Gaziano, assistant professor, Harvard School of Medicine. "In developing countries, where the burden of CVD is highest, these simple steps could deliver a significant long-term impact and must be something that governments trying to manage rising healthcare costs should consider."

CVD is the world's biggest killer, claiming 17.3 million lives each year. More than 80 per cent of CVD deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Projections suggest that CVD will remain the single leading cause of death, and by 2030 will be responsible for 23.6 million deaths each year.

Salt intake and cardiovascular disease

Elevated sodium intake has significant implications for cardiovascular health. A positive relationship between salt intake and high blood pressure has been established, while salt reduction trials have revealed that a decrease in salt intake is directly related to a decrease in blood pressure.

Hypertension (high blood pressure) is one of the major preventable risk factors for premature death from CVD worldwide. High blood pressure contributes to around half of all CVD and the risk of developing CVD doubles for every 10-point increase in diastolic blood pressure.

High blood pressure that is left untreated can greatly increase a person's risk of developing CVD. Treating raised blood pressure has been associated with a 35-40 per cent reduction in the risk of stroke and at least a 16 per cent reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction.


'/>"/>

Contact: Charanjit Jagait
charanjit.jagait@worldheart.org
41-796-253-296
World Heart Federation
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Vitiligo skin disorder could yield clues in fight against melanoma
2. Saliva proteins could help detection of oral cancer
3. Research about plant viruses could lead to new ways to improve crop yields
4. Nanodiamond drug device could transform cancer treatment
5. UNC study on properties of carbon nanotubes, water could have wide-ranging implications
6. So-called sandfish could help materials handling and process technology specialists
7. Discovery of natural compounds that could slow blood vessel growth
8. Researchers design artificial cells that could power medical implants
9. Herbicide-resistant grape could revitalize Midwest wine industry
10. Sensitive laser instrument could aid search for life on Mars
11. Could Dr. House be replaced by a computer?
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/13/2017)... MONICA, Calif. , April 13, 2017 ... New York will feature emerging and evolving ... Summits. Both Innovation Summits will run alongside the expo ... of speaker sessions, panels and demonstrations focused on trending ... coast,s largest advanced design and manufacturing event will take ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   ... announces the appointment of independent Directors Mr. Robin D. ... Board of Directors, furthering the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , ... forward to their guidance and benefiting from their considerable expertise ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... YORK , April 4, 2017   EyeLock ... today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark ... patent broadly covers the linking of an iris image ... same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal biometric ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/16/2017)... 16, 2017  This year,s edition of the Inc. 5000 features a ... workforce solutions, has made the list for the third year in a ... fastest-growing private companies based on a set of quantitative metrics. In addition, ... fastest-growing companies in the Bay State . ... Inc. 5000 ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... August 15, 2017 , ... Nanomedical Diagnostics ... biotherapeutics development, announces the launch of the new NHS Agile biosensor chip ... binding data for a wide range of molecules, including small and large molecules, ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 15, 2017 , ... The ... time on Immuno-Oncology 360° (IO360°) programming through a series of upcoming panels and events. ... February 7-9, 2018, at The Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. , “With our ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... ... August 14, 2017 , ... ... interconnect using USB or PCI Express, announced the release of SYZYGY™, a new ... to satisfy the need for a compact, low cost, low pin-count, high-performance connectivity ...
Breaking Biology Technology: