Navigation Links
TGen and Genomic Health Inc. discover genes affecting cancer drug
Date:1/13/2011

PHOENIX, Ariz. Jan. 13, 2011 Genomic research could help doctors better target a drug widely used to treat colorectal cancer patients, according to a study by Genomic Health Inc. (Nasdaq: GHDX) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The drug, oxaliplatin, is widely used in colon cancer. It is used in early disease, following surgery in those cancers that are likely to recur. It is also used in advanced disease to slow progression of the cancer where it has spread to other parts of the body.

However, a significant number of patients experience serious side effects, including prolonged damage to the nervous system, "creating an urgent need to identify genes that are responsible for drug sensitivity or resistance, which results in directing therapy to those most likely to benefit," according to the study published in Molecular Cancer Research.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer in the U.S., annually diagnosed in more than 146,000 Americans. It also is the third highest cause of cancer death in the U.S., annually killing nearly 50,000 people, more than who die each year on the nation's roadways. This cancer affects men and women in nearly equal numbers.

Nerve damage, or neurotoxicity, associated with oxaliplatin is most commonly manifest as pain or a loss of sensation in the hands and feet and can severely affect a patient's quality of life and ability to work. These symptoms are experienced in some form by the majority of patients receiving this drug and, for some patients, can be permanent.

The TGen/Genomic Health researchers examined the role of individual cancer genes to influence the sensitivity or resistance of colon cancer cells grown in laboratory culture. An interfering RNA screen of 500 genes with 2,000 unique siRNA sequences identified 27 genes that, when silenced, altered the sensitivity of colon tumor cells to oxaliplatin, causing damage to the cancer cells' DNA and inhibiting the cancer cells' ability to reproduce and survive, the study said. This study has also showed that diverse gene networks also play a role in the ability of the drug to impact colon tumors.

"These 27 genes, whose loss of function significantly affect the effectiveness of oxaliplatin, may be promising therapeutic biomarkers for oxaliplatin," said Dr. Holly Yin, head of TGen's Cellular Genomics Collaborative Center in Scottsdale, and a co-author of the study.

Dr. Robert J. Pelham, a research scientist at Redwood City, Calif.-based Genomic Health and the study's senior author, said the findings indicate a need for additional clinical studies on tumor specimens in patients treated with oxaliplatin. "Such future clinical studies could eventually lead to potential clinical applications, where patients could benefit," Dr. Pelham said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists decipher 3 billion-year-old genomic fossils
2. Reportlinker Adds Personalized Medicine Market - Advances in Human Genomics and Proteomics to Challenge Traditional Therapeutics
3. Genomic fault zones come and go
4. Salk Institute creates Renato Dulbecco Chair in Genomics and Roger Guillemin Chair in Neuroscience
5. Mississauga teacher awarded prize for excellence in teaching genomics
6. LSU researcher participates in NIH-funded study ushering in the age of personal genomics
7. Structural genomics accelerates protein structure determination
8. Genomic comparison of ocean microbes reveals East-West divide in populations
9. Structural Genomics Consortium releases 1,000th protein structure
10. Genomic haircut makes worlds tiniest genome even smaller: UBC research
11. NIH expands key pharmacogenomics resource
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/2/2016)... , June 2, 2016 Perimeter ... Platforms, Unmanned Systems, Physical Infrastructure, Support & Other Service  ... visiongain offers comprehensive analysis of the global ... market will generate revenues of $17.98 billion in 2016. ... DVTEL Inc, a leader in software and hardware technologies ...
(Date:5/12/2016)... WearablesResearch.com , a brand of Troubadour ... from the Q1 wave of its quarterly wearables survey. ... receptivity to a program where they would receive discounts ... company. "We were surprised to see that ... LaColla , CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily because there ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... LONDON , April 26, 2016 ... a product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: ... to integrate the Onegini mobile security platform with ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151104/283829LOGO ) The integration will ... to access and transact across channels. Using this ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... 2016  Global demand for enzymes is forecast ... to $7.2 billion.  This market includes enzymes used ... biofuel production, animal feed, and other markets) and ... Food and beverages will remain the largest market ... of products containing enzymes in developing regions.  These ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... medical technologies, services and solutions to the healthcare market. The company's primary focus ... distribution, manufacturing, sales and marketing strategies that are necessary to help companies efficiently ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Epic Sciences unveiled a ... susceptible to PARP inhibitors by targeting homologous recombination ... The new test has already been incorporated into ... cancer types. Over 230 clinical trials ... pathways, including PARP, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK and WEE-1. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016   Boston Biomedical ... novel compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, ... been granted Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. ... of gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. ... designed to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting ...
Breaking Biology Technology: