Navigation Links
TB -- hiding in plain sight
Date:5/21/2009

Stockholm, Sweden and Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Current research suggests that Mycobacterium tuberculosis can evade the immune response. The related report by Rahman et al, "Compartmentalization of immune responses in human tuberculosis: few CD8+ effector T cells but elevated levels of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the granulomatous lesions," appears in the June 2009 issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

More than two million people worldwide die from tuberculosis infection every year. Due in part to inappropriate antibiotic usage, there are a rising number (0.5 million in 2007) of cases of multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB) tuberculosis. New therapies are needed to treat these dangerous infections.

Immune responses to tuberculosis rarely result in complete eradication of the infection. Instead, TB-infected immune cells promote the generation of chronic inflammation and the formation of granulomas, which are areas where the bacteria are contained but not destroyed. A group led by Dr. Susanna Grundstrom Brighenti at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden therefore examined the immune response in patients infected with tuberculosis. This is the first study describing the immunoregulatory mechanism associated with the development of clinical disease at the site of infection in human TB. They found that while the immune cells responsible for killing the tuberculosis bacteria surrounded the granuloma, these cells had low levels of the molecules necessary to kill the TB. Instead, granulomas had high numbers of regulatory immune cells. These regulatory cells suppress the immune response, resulting in the survival of the tuberculosis bacteria and perhaps contributing to persistent long-term infection.

This study by Rahman et al "provide[s] evidence that the adaptive immune response in establishment of clinical TB [is] skewed towards a suppressive or regulatory phenotype that may inhibit proper immune activation and down-regulate the host response at the local site of infection. Compartmentalization of the immune response in human TB could be part of the reason why infection is never completely eradicated but instead develops into a chronic disease." In future studies, Dr. Grundstrom Brighenti and colleagues plan to "pursue new strategies developed to enhance cell-mediated immune responses that are known to provide protective immunity in patients with TB. Such an approach may involve targeting of certain subpopulations of immune cells with anti-inflammatory or immunoregulatory properties."


'/>"/>

Contact: Angela Colmone
acolmone@asip.org
301-634-7953
American Journal of Pathology
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. No hiding place for infecting bacteria
2. Using dominance to explain dog behavior is old hat
3. Disappearing act of worlds second largest fish explained
4. CSHL researchers explain process by which cells hide potentially dangerous DNA segments
5. New evidence explains poor infant immune response to certain vaccines, says MU researcher
6. Computer simulations explain the limitations of working memory
7. Gene linked to lupus might explain gender difference in disease risk
8. Difference in fat storage may explain lower rate of liver disease in African-Americans
9. Unexplained chest pain can be due to stress
10. Fish guts explain marine carbon cycle mystery
11. MUHC and McGill scientists explain genetic disease first discovered in Quebec 24 years ago
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
TB -- hiding in plain sight
(Date:11/30/2016)... CHICAGO , Nov. 30, 2016  higi ... a new partnership initiative targeting national brands, industry ... and reward their respective audiences for taking steps ... Since its inception in 2012, higi has built ... US, impacting over 38 million people who have ...
(Date:11/24/2016)... -- Cercacor today introduced Ember TM Sport Premium ... measure hemoglobin, Oxygen Content, Oxygen Saturation, Perfusion Index, ... approximately 30 seconds. Smaller than a smartphone, using only ... key data about their bodies to help monitor these ... Hemoglobin carries oxygen to muscles. When hemoglobin and ...
(Date:11/17/2016)... Nov. 17, 2016 Global Market Watch: ... (Disease-Based Banks, Population-Based Banks and Academics) market is to witness ... Private Biobanks shows the highest Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) ... region during the analysis period 2014-2020. North America ... 9.95% followed by Europe at 9.56% ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... , ... DrugDev believes the only way to achieve real change ... three tenets were on display at the 2nd Annual DrugDev User Summit (hosted by ... and site organizations to discuss innovation and the future of clinical research. , ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... Robots will storm the Prudential Center in Boston, ... The event, which is held on the United Nations International Day of Persons with ... into the workplace. Suitable Technologies is partnering with NTI to showcase how technology can ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... leader in rapid infectious disease tests, introduced the Company,s newest product, the INSTI HIV ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161201/444905 ) Continue Reading ... ... , bioLytical was invited by the Clinton Health ... Self Test to 350 pharmacy representatives in Nairobi and Mombasa, ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... , November 30, 2016 ... a few players hold a dominant share in the ... River Laboratories International, Inc., and Merck KGaA, held a ... 2015. Transparency Market Research observes that these companies are ... on development products that are do not require rabbit ...
Breaking Biology Technology: