Navigation Links
Symposium highlights epigenetic effects of milk
Date:4/5/2013

It seems the ads were right. A milk mustache is a good thing to have. Animal and dairy scientists have discovered that drinking milk at an early age can help mammals throughout their lives.

But understanding exactly how milk affects the body is a complicated story of hormones, antibodies and proteins, as well as other cells and compounds researchers have not yet identified.

Learning how milk affects offspring was the subject of the Lactation Biology Symposium, held as part of the 2012 Joint Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ. The presentations were summarized in a recent paper in the Journal of Animal Science.

The presentations focused on epigenetics, or how gene expression changes based on factors like environment or diet. Epigenetic changes modify when or how certain traits are expressed.

The first presenter, Dr. Frank Bartol from Auburn University, explained how certain hormones, called lactocrines, in pig's milk affect gene expression in piglets. Bartol said lactrocrines could modify gene expression in the reproductive systems; however, Bartol said the specific effects of lactocrines are still being studied.

In the next presentation, Dr. Harald Hammon, from the Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, explained how drinking milk affects future nutrition. According to Hammon, the milk produced in the first few days after birth, called colostrum, contains growth factors that help young calves better digest and absorb lactose and glucose. Hammon called for more research into identifying these factors and better describing their effects.

Studying milk is important not just for studying future fertility and nutrition, but future milk production as well. Dr. Paul Kenyon, from Massey University in New Zealand, suggested that either underfeeding or overfeeding milk could reduce milk production in the offspring. Though the differences in milk yield were small, there could still be an economic difference for dairy farmers.

The research presented at the Lactation Biology Symposium could have implications for human health as well. Dr. Katie Hinde, from Harvard University, revealed how the components of mother's milk could alter infant behavior and cell development through epigenetic mechanisms. In Hinde's studies of rhesus monkeys, infants who had mothers producing milk higher in milk energy and cortisol were more active, playful, exploratory and bold.

"Milk is, therefore, not merely food that allows the body to grow but it contains constituents that help build the brain and provide the energy that allows infants to be behaviorally active," wrote K. M. Daniels et. al. in a review of the Lactation Biology Symposium.

Research into milk could help researchers better understand farm animals, the dairy industry and human health. Figuring out which compounds are found in milk and how they affect gene expression in offspring could advance knowledge in body development at all stages of life.

"At present there are far more questions than answers," Bartol said in an interview. "However, we are making progress."


'/>"/>

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madelinems@asas.org
217-689-2435
American Society of Animal Science
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. 5th Annual Advances in Biomolecular Engineering Symposium
2. Science, Innovation, and Partnerships for Sustainability -- Symposium May 16-18
3. Coral reef experts to present latest coral reef science during July symposium
4. FirstMark Exhibiting and Presenting at the San Diego Academy of Family Physicians 55th Annual Postgraduate Symposium
5. Topics to be discussed during July International Coral Reef Symposium
6. MARC Travel Awards announced for the 26th Annual Symposium of the Protein Society
7. The genomics symposium to boost the further development of cancer research
8. 12th International Coral Reef Symposium
9. Symposium: Protein-Folding Diseases: Models & Mechanisms
10. FDAs 2012 Science Writers Symposium
11. Danforth Plant Science Center hosts 14th Annual Fall Symposium
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/10/2016)... --> --> ... and Access Management Market by Component (Provisioning, Directory Services, ... Organization Size, by Deployment, by Vertical, and by Region ... market is estimated to grow from USD 7.20 Billion ... a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 12.2% during ...
(Date:3/9/2016)... 2016 This BCC Research report provides an ... RNA Sequencing (RNA Seq) market for the years 2015, ... and reagents, data analysis, and services. Use ... RNA-Sequencing market such as RNA-Sequencing tools and reagents, RNA-Sequencing ... affecting each segment and forecast their market growth, future ...
(Date:3/9/2016)... , March 9, 2016  Crossmatch ® , ... enrollment solutions, today announced the addition of smart ... Altus multi-factor authentication platform. New contextual and ... to step-up security where it,s needed most — ... Washington, DC . --> ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... to transform technology into a viable company, CereScan’s CEO, John Kelley, joined other ... a recognized leader and mentor in the Denver area business community, shared his ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Intelligent Implant Systems announced today that the two-level components for ... the United States. These components expand the capabilities of the system and allow ... in October of 2015, the company has seen significant sales growth in 1Q 2016, ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 The ... and Brayton Cryocoolers), Service (Technical Support, Product Repairs & ... - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the ... Billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 7.29% between ... data Tables and 94 Figures spread through 159 Pages ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... Connecticut's innovative, growing companies, today announced the launch of VentureClash , a ... companies. , “VentureClash looks to attract the best early-stage companies here ...
Breaking Biology Technology: