Navigation Links
Sugar-sweetened beverages may increase cardiovascular risk in women
Date:11/13/2011

Drinking two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day may expand a woman's waistline and increase her risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011.

In this study, researchers compared middle-aged and older women who drank two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day, such as carbonated sodas or flavored waters with added sugar, to women who drank one or less daily. Women consuming two or more beverages per day were nearly four times as likely to develop high triglycerides, and were significantly more likely to increase their waist sizes and to develop impaired fasting glucose levels. The same associations were not observed in men.

"Women who drank more than two sugar-sweetened drinks a day had increasing waist sizes, but weren't necessarily gaining weight," said Christina Shay, Ph.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. "These women also developed high triglycerides and women with normal blood glucose levels more frequently went from having a low risk to a high risk of developing diabetes over time."

The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) included food frequency surveys in 4,166 African-American, Caucasian, Chinese-Americans and Hispanic adults 45 to 84 years old. At the beginning of the study the participants didn't have cardiovascular disease.

Researchers assessed risk factors in three follow-up exams spanning five years starting in 2002. Participants were monitored for weight gain, increases in waist circumference, low levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL "good" cholesterol), high levels of low density lipoproteins (LDL "bad" cholesterol), high triglycerides, impaired fasting glucose levels, and type 2 diabetes.

"Most people assume that individuals who consume a lot of sugar-sweetened drinks have an increase in obesity, which in turn, increases their risk for heart disease and diabetes," said Shay, formerly of Northwestern University's Department of Preventive Medicine in Chicago, where the study was conducted. "Although this does occur, this study showed that risk factors for heart disease and stroke developed even when the women didn't gain weight."

Women may have a greater chance for developing cardiovascular disease risk factors from sugar-sweetened drinks because they require fewer calories than men which makes each calorie count more towards cardiovascular risk in women, Shay said.

Researchers have yet to determine exactly how sugar-sweetened beverages influence cardiovascular risk factors such as high triglycerides in individuals who do not gain weight, Shay said, but further work is planned to try and figure that out.


'/>"/>

Contact: AHA News Media Office
214-706-1396
American Heart Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers investigate muscle-building effect of protein beverages for athletes
2. Kids now see fewer television ads for sweets and beverages, but more for fast food
3. Beverages leave geographic signatures that can track peoples movements
4. Conservationists call for increased focus on coastal ecosystems
5. Obesity hormone adiponectin increases the risk of osteoporosis in the elderly
6. Production of biofuel from forests will increase greenhouse emissions
7. Burden of osteoporotic fractures increases dramatically in the Middle East and Africa
8. Fluoride shuttle increases storage capacity
9. Gene variant leads to better memory via increased brain activation
10. Exercise before and during early pregnancy increases two beneficial proteins for mothers-to-be
11. Scientists discover 3 new gene faults which could increase melanoma risk by 30 percent
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/16/2017)... 16, 2017  Veratad Technologies, LLC ( www.veratad.com ), ... and identity verification solutions, announced today they will participate ... May 15 thru May 17, 2017, in ... Trade Center. Identity impacts the lives ... today,s quickly evolving digital world, defining identity is critical ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in SoC-based imaging ... server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec technology. A ... Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan ... at the Las Vegas Convention Center April ... Click here for ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... to their offering. ... eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during ... Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis ... and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... June 22, 2017 , ... For ... has produced a Spotlight series on “Cell Therapy Regulation” for ... by leading experts on the unique regulatory challenges of stem cell medical research. ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... CTNext , Connecticut’s ... has formed a Higher Education Entrepreneurship Advisory Committee to implement the recommendations of ... other high-ranking representatives from 35 higher education institutions across the state over the ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... June 20, 2017 , ... Do ... makes the transition from being a trusted supplier in the weighing industry, to extending ... cell extractions, ELISA essays, enzyme reactions, immunoassays, hybridizations and more, allowing for its ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... June 19, 2017 , ... A colony of healthy honey ... and tissues by delivering pollen and nectar containing nutrients necessary for growth and survival. ... healthy. , Many recent indicators point to a decline in honey bee health. Sick ...
Breaking Biology Technology: