Navigation Links
Study shows more genes are controlled by biological clocks
Date:8/29/2008

The tick-tock of your biological clock may have just gotten a little louder.

Researchers at the University of Georgia report that the number of genes under control of in living things than suspected only a few years ago. The biological clock in a much-studied model organism is dramatically higher than previously reported. The new study implies that the clock may be much more important

"This new finding may help to explain why the clock is so far-reaching in its effects on the organism," said Jonathan Arnold, a professor in the UGA department of genetics and director of the research project. "We found that some 25 percent of the genes in our model organism appear to be under clock control. I wasn't suspecting anything remotely like that."

The new research, just published in the Public Library of Science One, also shows how Arnold's team used a new methodology called Computing Life to yield these new discoveries about biological clocks. And this tool of systems biology was the key to showing what makes a biological clock tick.

In addition to Arnold, authors of the paper include Wubei Dong, James Griffith, Roger Nielsen and Rosemary Kim in the department of genetics, and Xiaojia Tang, Yihai Yu and Bernd Schuttler of the department of physics and astronomy. Griffith also has an appointment in the College of Environmental and Agricultural Sciences. The department of genetics is in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

The team's new discoveries about the extent of genes under the control of the biological clock and the utility of Computing Life came from studying genes in Neurospora crassabread mold. In fact, much of what science knows about biological clocks has come from studying Neurospora.

Before the current research, only 16 clock-controlled genes had been discovered in Neurospora in more than 40 years of research. Arnold's team uncovered a remarkable 295 genes that are influenced by the biological clockand that number could be dramatically higher, given the conservative controls the researchers put on their work.

"It appears the clock influences a number of biological processes, including cell cycling, protein metabolism and varied signaling processes," said Arnold. "But perhaps the most important role we've seen so far is the clock's role in ribosome biogenesis."

Ribosomes assemble individual amino acids into polypeptide chains by binding a messenger RNA and then using this as a template to connect the correct sequence of amino acids. Ribosome biogenesis is the process of making ribosomes, so knowledge that the process is under clock control adds a dramatic new dimension to the clock's inherent biological value as an adaptation.

The new Computing Life technology, refined in the Arnold and Schuttler labs, integrates several cycles of modeling and experiments to yield discoveries about a genetic network. Using Computing Life, the scientists were able to unravel how a network of genes and their products tell time, thereby demonstrating the solution of one of the key problems in systems biology.

"The resulting molecular mechanism or genetic network for the clock identified by this mode-guided discovery process will have a broad appeal to geneticists, physiologists and those with an interest in signaling pathways," said Arnold. "The methods used to characterize what makes a biological clock tick will have numerous applications in finding genetic networks describing other complex traits in many biological systems."

Computing Life will also allow researchers to design a sequence of genomics experiments that will winnow the field of competing hypotheses and to move experiments in directions where new discoveries are likely to arise.

Biological clocks hold the key to much of life and disease processes. In February 2007, Arnold's team reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the first working model that explains how biological clocks operate. The UGA scientists discovered how three genes in Neurospora make such a clock tick at the molecular level.

That discovery also had broad implications for understanding biochemical signaling and other regulatory processes in cells, Arnold said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Phil Williams
phil@franklin.uga.edu
706-542-8501
University of Georgia
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Armored fish study helps strengthen Darwins natural selection theory
2. Study says eyes evolved for X-Ray vision
3. Study of islands reveals surprising extinction results
4. Study points to potential new use for Viagra
5. Unique study shows oil, gas seismic work not affecting Gulf sperm whales
6. ETH Zurich study on salmonella self-destruction
7. Researchers study facial structures, brain abnormalities to reveal formula for detection of autism
8. Childrens national co-leads nationwide study of landmark sickle cell treatment
9. Largest study of its kind implicates gene abnormalities in bipolar disorder
10. Sweets make young horses harder to train in Montana State study
11. Light receptors in eye play key role in setting biological clock, study shows
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... and ITHACA, N.Y. , June ... Cornell University, a leader in dairy research, today announced ... designed to help reduce the chances that the global ... onset of this dairy project, Cornell University has become ... Sequencing the Food Supply Chain, a food safety initiative ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... 2017  Hunova, the first robotic gym for the rehabilitation and functional ... in Genoa, Italy . The first 30 robots will ... USA . The technology was developed and patented at ... IIT spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to a 10 million euro investment from ... click: ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... 16, 2017   Bridge Patient Portal , ... MD EMR Systems , an electronic medical ... GE, have established a partnership to build an ... the GE Centricity™ products, including Centricity Practice Solution ... These new integrations will allow healthcare delivery ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/17/2017)... ... July 17, 2017 , ... ... solutions, today announced safety software company AB Cube has joined its ... segment to advance technology innovation across life sciences and healthcare. Under the ...
(Date:7/17/2017)... ... , ... Panitch Schwarze Belisario & Nadel intellectual ... Innovation Group) annual meeting in China. , This year’s meeting, held June 9-10 ... a rapidly developing highly personalized anti-cancer technology that involves removing some of a ...
(Date:7/16/2017)... ... July 16, 2017 , ... OHAUS Corporation, ... the launch of its new line of Rocking and Waving Shakers today. , ... models (both analog and digital) for laboratory applications in a variety of environmental ...
(Date:7/14/2017)... ... July 14, 2017 , ... Sonic Manufacturing Technologies is proud ... installed a solar system on its roof top. “We will be independent of ... Kenneth Raab stated. The company’s proud history of social responsibility and participation in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: