Navigation Links
Study reveals how high-fat diet during pregnancy increases risk of stillbirth
Date:6/2/2011

PORTLAND, Ore. Eating a high-fat diet during pregnancy increases the chance of stillbirth, according to new research at Oregon Health & Science University. The new data show eating a typical American diet, which is high in fat, decreases blood flow from the mother to the placenta, the temporary organ that nourishes the unborn fetus. Prior to this study, exactly how a fatty diet contributes to stillbirth was unclear. The findings are published in the June edition of the journal Endocrinology.

The study was conducted at the OHSU Oregon National Primate Research Center. Because the placental structure of the Japanese macaque is very similar to that in humans, cause and effect can be better established. The researchers hope their work will inform expectant moms and their physicians about the inherent dangers of a high-calorie, high-fat diet.

"This study demonstrates that maternal diet during pregnancy has a profound influence on both placental and fetal development. The high-calorie, high-fat diet common in our society has negative effects on placental function and may be a significant contributor to adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as stillbirth," said Antonio Frias, M.D., principal investigator and assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology (perinatology/maternal-fetal medicine) in the OHSU School of Medicine.

Previous studies have shown that nearly all adverse outcomes during pregnancy -- abnormal fetal growth, preeclampsia, preterm labor and stillbirth -- are in some way associated with an abnormally developed, or damaged, placenta, the temporary organ that nourishes the unborn fetus. In addition, maternal obesity has been associated with placental inflammation and dysfunction and an increased risk of stillbirth. Considering these findings, the researchers hypothesized that eating a diet high in fat during pregnancy also may increase the risk of placental inflammation and the risk of stillbirth.

Frias and colleagues observed 24 pregnant Japanese macaques that ate either a diet comprising 32 percent calories from fat or a control diet with 14 percent fat calories for at least four years.

The researchers found the monkeys that ate a high-fat diet experienced a significant decrease in blood flow from the uterus to the placenta, a reduction of 38 percent to 56 percent, and a rise in placental inflammation. This was the case regardless of whether the monkeys were obese or slender. The risk of stillbirth was further compounded, however, when the monkeys were obese with hyper-insulinemia, or pre-diabetes.

Additional studies are needed to determine exactly how a high-fat diet decreases placental blood flow, the researchers report.

Future studies also will investigate the impact of dietary changes and diet supplementation on improving outcomes in both monkeys and humans.


'/>"/>

Contact: Tamara Hargens-Bradley
hargenst@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study finds copper proves effective against new E. coli strains
2. Farmer networks hold key to agricultural innovation in developing countries, Stanford study finds
3. Study finds greenhouse gas reduction strategy may be safe for soil animals
4. Blueberrys effects on cholesterol examined in lab animal study
5. Study: Biodegradable products may be bad for the environment
6. Mouse virus erroneously linked to chronic fatigue syndrome, UCSF collaborative study finds
7. Study reveals that financial conflicts of interest are associated with positive study outcomes
8. TGen study identifies compounds that could slow down Alzheimers disease
9. Study finds 2 gene classes linked to new prion formation
10. New study suggests link between chronic estrogen exposure and high blood pressure
11. Study confirms link between rheumatoid arthritis and COPD
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/20/2017)... HANOVER, Germany , March 20, 2017 At ... Hamburg -based biometrics manufacturer DERMALOG. The Chancellor came to the ... Japan is this year,s CeBIT partner country. At the largest ... important biometrics in use: fingerprint, face and iris recognition as well as ... ...
(Date:3/9/2017)... FRANCISCO and MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. ... , "Eating Well Made Simple," and 23andMe , ... help guide better food choices.  Zipongo can now provide ... their food preferences, health goals and biometrics, but also ... certain food choices. Zipongo,s personalized food decision ...
(Date:3/2/2017)... 2017 Summary This report provides ... KGaA and its partnering interests and activities since 2010. ... Description The Partnering Deals and Alliance since 2010 report ... one of the world,s leading life sciences companies. ... to ensure inclusion of the most up to date ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... Florida , March 22, 2017 ... ... various cancer conditions are being pressured as of late due ... for cancer pain management has a dramatic impact on patient,s ... research and development activities for identifying new forms of opioid ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... ... Premier executive recruitment firm, Slone Partners, is proud to have been named ... , Hunt Scanlon Media is one of the most respected life science publications ... human capital sector. , “It is a great honor for Slone Partners to be ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 21, 2017 , ... ... Kickstarter , more than tripling its goal and raising over $30,000 in the ... garden that grows nutritious veggies & herbs fast, easy, and affordably, anywhere. , ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... WI (PRWEB) , ... March 22, 2017 , ... The ... scientific research agencies as outlined in the Administration’s recently published fiscal year 2018 budget ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH) by $5.8 billion or roughly 20% of its ...
Breaking Biology Technology: