Navigation Links
Study proposes new theory of how viruses may contribute to cancer
Date:10/23/2007

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 23 A new study suggests that viruses may contribute to cancer by causing excessive death to normal cells while promoting the growth of surviving cells with cancerous traits. Viruses may act as forces of natural selection by wiping out normal cells that support the replication of viruses and leaving behind those cells that have acquired defects in their circuitry. When this process is repeated over and over, cancer can develop say study authors, led by Preet M. Chaudhary, M.D., Ph.D., professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Their findings are published by Public Library of Science in the Oct. 24 issue of PLoS ONE.

Infection with viruses has been linked to many human cancers, including some forms of Hodgkins and non-Hodgkins lymphomas, sarcomas and cancers of the throat and liver. Over the years, scientists have proposed a number of mechanisms to explain this link. One commonly held belief is that when a virus infects a cell, its genetic material alters the cell, making it grow uncontrollably, eventually leading to cancer. Some viruses also are thought to promote cancer by causing chronic inflammation. In his study, Dr. Chaudhary proposes that viruses also can lead to cancer in a less direct manner.

We believe a separate mechanism may be at play in which a cellular insult, such as infection with a virus, selects a few pre-existing mutated clones of cells, promotes their further growth and multiplication, eventually leading to the emergence of fully cancerous cells. Consequently, similar to the role played by natural selection during evolution, excessive cell death, rather than its absence, may be a defining force that drives the initial emergence of cancer, said Dr. Chaudhary. He named this model the Phoenix Paradigm in which cancer theoretically arises out of the ashes of dead cells.

The paradigm was developed based on a study of cells infected with the Kaposis sarcoma associated herpesvirus, or KSHV, also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). The researchers examined a gene called K13 that activates a pathway previously implicated in cancer development. Cells with low K13 expression allowed KSHV to replicate, and these cells subsequently died off, the researchers noted. Cells with higher expression of K13 emerged after KSHV replication and showed defective expression of two key proteins that are known to promote cancer.

This paradigm, if validated by further studies, has implications not only for an improved understanding of the processes involved in cancer, but also for the development of effective strategies for its prevention and treatment, said Dr. Chaudhary.


'/>"/>

Contact: Clare Collins
CollCX@upmc.edu
412-647-3555
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Bioartificial kidney under study at MCG
2. Novel Asthma Study Shows Multiple Genetic Input Required; Single-gene Solution Shot Down
3. W.M. Keck Foundation funds study of friendly microbes
4. Yellowstone microbes fueled by hydrogen, according to U. of Colorado study
5. Emory Study Tests Bone Marrow Stem Cells to Improve Circulation in Legs
6. UCLA Study Shows One-Third of Drug Ads in Medical Journals Do Not Contain References Supporting Medical Claims
7. Study Demonstrates Gene Expression Microarrays are Comparable and Reproducible
8. Study Links Ebola Outbreaks To Animal Carcasses
9. Genome-wide mouse study yields link to human leukemia
10. Breakthrough Microarray-based Technology for the Study of Cancer
11. NYU Study Reveals How Brains Immune System Fights Viral Encephalitis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/5/2016)...  The Office of Justice Programs, National Institute ... Enhance or Replace Medico Legal Autopsies?" on NIJ.gov.  ... replacing forensic autopsies with postmortem X-ray computed tomography, ... response to recommendations made by The National Academy ... as a potential component of medicolegal death investigations. ...
(Date:11/29/2016)... BOSTON , Nov. 29, 2016 BioDirection, ... rapid point-of-care products for the objective detection of concussion ... the company has successfully completed a meeting with the ... company,s Tbit™ blood test Pre-Submission Package. During the meeting ... Tbit™ system as a precursor to commencement of a ...
(Date:11/22/2016)... 22, 2016 According to the new market research ... Face, Vein, Signature, Voice), Multi-Factor), Component (Hardware and Software), Function (Contact and ... the market is expected to grow from USD 10.74 Billion in 2015 ... between 2016 and 2022. Continue Reading ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... , ... There’s a winning streak at Voxx Analytics: the tech company has ... the award last year as well. Employees nominate their companies for the honor, and ... to the tech company’s upbeat environment as a reason. “We don’t answer to Wall ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... KONG , Dec. 9, 2016 China Cord ... "Company"), China,s leading provider of cord ... cell storage services, today announced the results of its 2016 ... in Hong Kong S.A.R., China . ... ratified the re-appointment of KPMG Huazhen LLP as ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... La Jolla, CA (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... that 2016 was a banner year for team building events, new program offerings and ... focus, which it expanded earlier this year to include groups of over 30 people. ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... DIEGO , Dec. 8, 2016  Renova™ ... for congestive heart failure and type 2 diabetes, ... for a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector developed ... , M.D., Ph.D., at Stanford University. The company ... its paracrine gene therapy product pipeline. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: