Navigation Links
Study may aid efforts to prevent uncontrolled cell division in cancer
Date:5/28/2009

Researchers from the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have uncovered a remarkable property of the contractile ring, a structure required for cell division. Understanding how the contractile ring works to divide the cell may facilitate development of therapies to prevent uncontrolled cell division in cancer.

The researchers show that even though both cell volume and the length of the contractile ring are reduced during successive rounds of embryonic cell division the duration or timing of cell division remains the same. Their study will be published in the May 29 issue of the journal Cell.

"We showed that contractile rings constrict at a constant rate that is proportional to the initial size of the cell, so that rings in larger cells constrict proportionally faster than rings in smaller cells," said Karen Oegema, PhD, associate professor at the Ludwig Institute and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center. "Because of this property, the time required to complete cell division remains the same during embryogenesis, even as cells get smaller."

During their early development, embryos are progressively partitioned into smaller and smaller cells by successive rounds of cell division. The division of one cell into two is accomplished by the contractile ring, which is assembled from two protein filament types also used in muscle. During cell division, the genome is replicated and the two copies are separated to opposite sides of the cell. A contractile ring forms a belt around the cell middle; constriction or closure of this ring "tightens the belt," pinching the mother cell into two daughter cells.

In early embryogenesis, cell volume and the length of the contractile ring around the cell middle are reduced at each successive round of cell division. By contrast, the dimension of the chromosomes which carry the genetic material that is segregated to the daughter cells remains constant. The discovery that contractile rings constrict at a constant rate, proportionate to the initial cell size, opens the door to further studies of the mechanism.

"Further studies of the contractile ring could ultimately lead to improved therapies for cancer," said first author Ana Carvalho, PhD. "Understanding the cellular machinery required for cell division may teach us how to prevent the uncontrolled cell division that occurs in cancer."


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Benowitz
sbenowitz@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. The coming of biofuels: Study shows reducing gasoline emissions will benefit human health
2. Yale study: Most polluted ecosystems recoverable
3. Study shows CGM devices also benefit people with type 1 diabetes
4. Bolivian rainforest study suggests feeding behavior in monkeys and humans have ancient, shared roots
5. University of Florida study provides insight into evolution of first flowers
6. Study finds genetic links to age of first menstrual period and menopause
7. Study finds link between individual stress and adolescent obesity
8. WWF study says climate change could displace millions in Asias Coral Triangle
9. Study reveals conflict between doctors, midwives over homebirth
10. UNC study identifies genetic cause of most common form of breast cancer
11. Comprehensive genetic study paves way for new blood-pressure medicines
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... their offering. The report forecasts ... grow at a CAGR of 12.28% during the period 2016-2020. ... market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the ... report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... WASHINGTON , June 22, 2016 On ... highly-anticipated call to industry to share solutions for the ... by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), explains that ... nationals are departing the United States ... criminals, and to defeat imposters. Logo - ...
(Date:6/16/2016)... , June 16, 2016 ... size is expected to reach USD 1.83 billion ... Grand View Research, Inc. Technological proliferation and increasing ... applications are expected to drive the market growth. ... , The development of advanced multimodal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 01, 2016 , ... ... findings demonstrating the value of DNA microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) ... Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Using molecular test results from tumors with previously ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 01, 2016 , ... The Conference Forum has announced that the ... will take place on February 1-3, 2017 at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York ... program provides a unique 360-degree approach, which addresses the most up-to-date information regarding business ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... companies dedicated to collaboratively developing improved chemistry, manufacturing and control technologies for ... online UHPLC, with robust, probe-based sampling. , Online liquid chromatography analysis ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , December 2, 2016 The ... 2021, growing at a CAGR of 7.3% during the forecast period ... hospitals and diagnostic laboratories segment accounted for the largest share of ... ... report on global immunohistochemistry (IHC) market spread across 225 pages, profiling ...
Breaking Biology Technology: