Navigation Links
Study links chemicals widely found in plastics and processed food to elevated blood pressure in children and teens
Date:5/22/2013

NEW YORK, May 22, 2013. Plastic additives known as phthalates (pronounced THAL-ates) are odorless, colorless and just about everywhere: They turn up in flooring, plastic cups, beach balls, plastic wrap, intravenous tubing andaccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Preventionthe bodies of most Americans. Once perceived as harmless, phthalates have come under increasing scrutiny. A growing collection of evidence suggests dietary exposure to phthalates (which can leech from packaging and mix with food) may cause significant metabolic and hormonal abnormalities, especially during early development.

Now, new research published this Wednesday in the Journal of Pediatrics suggests that certain types of phthalates could pose another risk to children: compromised heart health. Drawing on data from a nationally representative survey of nearly 3,000 children and teens, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Washington and Penn State University School of Medicine, have documented for the first time a connection between dietary exposure to DEHP (di-2-ethyhexylphthalate), a common class of phthalate widely used in industrial food production, and elevated systolic blood pressure, a measure of pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts.

"Phthalates can inhibit the function of cardiac cells and cause oxidative stress that compromises the health of arteries. But no one has explored the relationship between phthalate exposure and heart health in children" says lead author Leonardo Trasande, MD, MPP, associate professor of pediatrics, environmental medicine and population health at NYU Langone Medical Center. "We wanted to examine the link between phthalates and childhood blood pressure in particular given the increase in elevated blood pressure in children and the increasing evidence implicating exposure to environmental exposures in early development of disease."

Hypertension is clinically defined as a systolic blood-pressure reading above 140 mm Hg. It's most common in people over 50 years old, although the condition is becoming increasingly prevalent among children owing to the global obesity epidemic. Recent national surveys indicate that 14 percent of American adolescents now have pre-hypertension or hypertension. "Obesity is driving the trend but our findings suggest that environmental factors may also be a part of the problem," says Dr. Trasande. "This is important because phthalate exposure can be controlled through regulatory and behavioral interventions."

Researchers from NYU School of Medicine, the University of Washington and Penn State University School of Medicine examined six years of data from a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population administered by the National Centers for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Phthalates were measured in urine samples using standard analysis techniques. Controlling for a number of potential confounders, including race, socioeconomic status, body mass index, caloric intake and activity levels, the researchers found that every three-fold increase in the level of breakdown products of DEHP in urine correlated with a roughly one-millimeter mercury increase in a child's blood pressure. "That increment may seem very modest at an individual level, but on a population level such shifts in blood pressure can increase the number of children with elevated blood pressure substantially," says Dr. Trasande. "Our study underscores the need for policy initiatives that limit exposure to disruptive environmental chemicals, in combination with dietary and behavioral interventions geared toward protecting cardiovascular health."


'/>"/>

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study reveals how fishing gear can cause slow death of whales
2. Gym class reduces probability of obesity, study finds for first time
3. Study provides insight into nesting behavior of dinosaurs
4. TGen and Riddell announce partnership for biomarker study of concussive injuries
5. Alligator stem cell study gives clues to tooth regeneration
6. Study identifies possible new acute leukemia marker, treatment target
7. Women altering menstruation cycles in large numbers, UO study shows
8. Study finds that bacteria organize according to rich-get-richer principle
9. Study finds brain system for emotional self-control
10. Bacteria adapt and evade nanosilvers sting -- new study
11. Clinical Tests Demonstrate Long-Term Effectiveness of Oral Glutathione Supplements - Kyowa Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/28/2017)... , Feb. 28, 2017   Acuant , a ... globally, announces significant enhancements to new and core technologies ... New products include mobile and desktop Acuant FRM TM ... - a real time manual review of identity ... technology provides the fastest and most accurate capture software ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... 2017  Securus Technologies, a leading provider of ... safety, investigation, corrections and monitoring, announces the appointment ... "Too often, too many offenders return to ... are trying to tackle this ongoing problem and ... family members. While significant steps are underway, Securus continues ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... LONDON , February 21, 2017 ... um 70 Millionen US-Dollar wachsen. Nach einem Gespräch mit mehr ... es einige Hindernisse zu überwinden gilt, um diese Prognose ... ... unter anderem die Mobilisierung der finanziellen Mittel für die ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... , March 24, 2017 Sinovac Biotech Ltd. ("Sinovac" or ... China , today announced that its board of ... date of the plan from March 27, 2017 to March 27, ... About Sinovac Biotech Ltd. ... Sinovac Biotech Ltd. is a ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... ... exhibits both viscous and elastic characteristics when deformed, which is identical to how ... to gently absorb compressive forces and return to its natural state along a ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... March 23, 2017  SeraCare Life Sciences, ... in vitro diagnostics manufacturers and clinical laboratories, ... first multiplexed Inherited Cancer reference material ... by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The Seraseq™ Inherited Cancer ... input from industry experts to validate the ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Kineta, Inc., a biotechnology company focused ... immuno-oncology, today announced the discovery and characterization of ... activate interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) via RIG-I ... regression in a murine colon carcinoma mouse model.  ... tumor regression to initial drug treatment were resistant ...
Breaking Biology Technology: