Navigation Links
Study indicates that induced labor may not lower risk of infection or respiratory problems in newborns
Date:2/8/2012

DALLAS (Feb. 9, 2012) In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that suggest that induction of labor in patients who suffer a rupture of membranes between the 34th and 37th week of gestation (before the onset of labor) does not reduce the risk of infection or respiratory problems in the newborn.

"Our research indicates that in patients who underwent close monitoring, known as expectant management, versus those whose labor was induced, there was no difference in the risk for infection in the newborn, breathing problems in the newborn or caesarean section rates," said David van der Ham, MD, with the Maastricht University Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht, Netherlands, and one of the study's authors. "Due to these findings, we suggested expectant management as opposed to induced labor when possible."

For the study, entitled Induction of Labor Versus Expectant Management in Women with Preterm Prelabor Rupture of Membranes Between 34 and 37 Weeks the PPROMEXIL-2 trial, van der Ham and his colleagues observed 536 women from January 2007 until September 2009, and 195 women from December 2009 until January 2011. The study was performed in a multicenter setting within the Dutch obstetric research consortium, in which 60 hospitals in the Netherlands collaborated. After 24 hours of ruptured membranes, patients were allocated to either immediate delivery or expectant management until 37 weeks of gestational age.

The results indicate that: expectant management prolonged pregnancy for 3.5 days; the risk for neonatal sepsis (infection of the newborn) overall was low (3.6%) and did not differ between treatment strategies; the risk for respiratory distress syndrome (breathing problems of the newborn) did not differ between treatment strategies; and caesarean section rates were equal in both treatment strategies. Combined with results of all previous published trials there was no difference in the identified risks.

In addition to van der Ham, the study was conducted by Jantien van der Heijden and Hans van Beek, VieCuri Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Venlo, Netherlands; Brent Opmeer, Academic Medical Center, Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Christine Willekes and Jan Nijhuis, Maastricht University Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht, Netherlands; Twan Mulder, Maastricht University Medical Center, Pediatrics, Maastricht, Netherlands; Rob Moonen, Atrium Medical Center, Pediatrics, Heerlen, Netherlands; Marielle van Pampus, University Medical Center Groningen, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Groningen, Netherlands; Mariet Groenewout, University Medical Center Groningen, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Groningen, Netherlands; Gerald Mantel, Isala klinieken, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Zwolle, Netherlands; Anneke Kwee, Dutch consortium AMPHIA trial, Netherlands; Hajo Wildschut, Erasmus Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Bettina Akerboom, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dordrecht, Netherlands; and Ben Mol, Academic Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Amsterdam, Netherlands.


'/>"/>

Contact: Vicki Bendure
vicki@bendurepr.com
202-374-9259
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. NIH study links high levels of cadmium, lead in blood to pregnancy delay
2. New study sheds light on genetics of rice metabolism
3. Study shows electron-beam irradiation reduces virus-related health risk in lettuce, spinach
4. A zap of cold plasma reduces harmful bacteria on raw chicken in Drexel study
5. Heat and cold damage corals in their own ways, Scripps study shows
6. Satellite study reveals critical habitat and corridors for worlds rarest gorilla
7. Body clock receptor linked to diabetes in new genetic study
8. Genetics study reveals how bacteria behind serious childhood disease evolve to evade vaccines
9. Study pinpoints genetic variation that raises a risk linked to bisphosphonates
10. UMass Amherst ecologists among the first to record and study deep-sea fish noises
11. Coastal storms have long-reaching effects, study says
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/18/2017)... Minn. , Jan. 18, 2017 ... technology company that supports the entire spectrum of ... has been another record-breaking year for the organization ... market interest in MedNet,s eClinical products and services. ... the tremendous marketplace success of iMedNet ...
(Date:1/12/2017)... , Jan. 12, 2017  New research undertaken by ... office of the future.  1,000 participants were simply asked which ... months which we may consider standard issue.  Insights on what ... 2017 were also gathered from futurists and industry leaders including ... James Canton .  Some of ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. , Jan. 11, 2017  Michael Johnson, ... from Foundation Venture Capital Group, Inc., has been named to the ... Johnson, 27,  was one of 600 people in 20 fields ... only four percent of the 15,000 applicants were selected. ... He is currently a PhD ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/18/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017   Parent Project ... fight to end Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) , ... the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Talem ... exploration of robotic technology to assist people living ... incorporate NJIT,s technology – an embedded computer, software, a ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... Dr. Dante Leven successfully implanted SpineFrontier’s A-CIFT™ Solofuse-P™. The operation took place on ... Valley Stream, NY. The procedure was an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion on ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... Announced in December ... Institutes (MII). U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker has announced the award of ... of Defense has announced the award of a new Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Researchers from a new study are stating that if levels of ... cancer treatment, this indicates there is still remaining prostate cancer cells that are more likely ... test has always been an indicator of whether a man’s prostate cancer is growing ...
Breaking Biology Technology: